No Free Lunch: Why Specified Complexity Cannot Be Purchased Without Intelligence

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Rowman & Littlefield, Nov 1, 2006 - Religion - 404 pages
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Darwin's greatest accomplishment was to show how life might be explained as the result of natural selection. But does Darwin's theory mean that life was unintended? William A. Dembski argues that it does not. In this book Dembski extends his theory of intelligent design. Building on his earlier work in The Design Inference (Cambridge, 1998), he defends that life must be the product of intelligent design. Critics of Dembski's work have argued that evolutionary algorithms show that life can be explained apart from intelligence. But by employing powerful recent results from the No Free Lunch Theory, Dembski addresses and decisively refutes such claims. As the leading proponent of intelligent design, Dembski reveals a designer capable of originating the complexity and specificity found throughout the cosmos. Scientists and theologians alike will find this book of interest as it brings the question of creation firmly into the realm of scientific debate.
 

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Great book

Contents

The Third Mode of Explanation
1
12 Rehabilitating Design
3
13 The ComplexitySpecification Criterion
6
14 Specification
15
15 Probabilistic Resources
18
16 False Negatives and False Positives
22
17 Why the Criterion Works
28
18 The Darwinian Challenge to Design
30
43 Statement of the Problem
187
44 Choosing the Right Fitness Function
192
45 Blind Search
196
46 The No Free Lunch Theorems
199
47 The Displacement Problem
203
48 Darwinian Evolution in Nature
207
49 Following the Information Trail
212
410 Coevolving Fitness Landscapes
224

19 The Constraining of Contingency
34
110 The Darwinian Extrapolation
37
Another Way to Detect Design?
45
22 Generalizing Fishers Approach
49
Nicholas Caputo
55
The Compressibility of Bit Strings
58
25 Detachability
62
26 Sweeping the Field of Chance Hypotheses
67
27 Justifying the Generalization
71
28 The Inflation of Probabilistic Resources
83
29 Design by Comparison
101
210 Design by Elimination
110
Specified Complexity as Information
125
32 Syntactic Statistical and Algorithmic Information
129
33 Information in Context
133
34 Conceptual and Physical Information
137
35 Complex Specified Information
140
36 Semantic Information
145
37 Biological Information
147
38 The Origin of Complex Specified Information
149
39 The Law of Conservation of Information
159
310 A Fourth Law of Thermodynamics?
166
Evolutionary Algorithms
179
42 Optimization
184
The Emergence of Irreducibly Complex Systems
239
52 The Challenge of Irreducible Complexity
246
53 Scaffolding and Roman Arches
252
54 Cooptation Patchwork and Bricolage
254
55 Incremental Indispensability
256
56 Reducible Complexity
261
57 Miscellaneous Objections
267
58 The Logic of Invariants
271
59 FineTuning Irreducible Complexity
279
510 Doing the Calculation
289
Design as a Scientific Research Program
311
62 The Pattern of Evolution
314
63 The Incompleteness of Natural Laws
325
64 Does Specified Complexity Have a Mechanism?
328
65 The Nature of Nature
333
66 Must All Design in Nature Be FrontLoaded?
343
67 Embodied and Unembodied Designers
347
68 Who Designed the Designer?
353
69 Testability
355
610 Magic Mechanism and Design
365
Index
381
About the Author
404
Copyright

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References to this book

Arguing about Gods
Graham Oppy
Limited preview - 2006
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About the author (2006)

William A. Dembski is associate research professor in the conceptual foundations of science at Baylor University and senior fellow with Discovery Institute's Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture in Seattle.

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