No Lack of Courage: Operation Medusa, Afghanistan

Front Cover
Dundurn, Oct 4, 2010 - History - 203 pages
0 Reviews
No Lack of Courage is the story of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's first battle. It is a revealing account of Operation Medusa, the largely Canadian action from 1 to 17 September 2006, to dislodge a heavily entrenched Taliban force in the Pashmul district of Afghanistan's Kandahar Province. At stake, according to senior Afghan politicians and NATO military commanders, was nothing less than the very existence of the reconstituted state of Afghanistan, as well as the NATO alliance itself. In a bitterly fought conflict that lasted more than two weeks, Canadian, Afghan, and Coalition troops defeated the dug-in enemy forces and chased them from the Pashmul area.

In the end, the brunt of the fighting fell on the Canadians, and the operation that saved Afghanistan exacted a great cost. However, the battle also demonstrated that Canada had shed its peacekeeping mythology and was once more ready to commit troops deliberately to combat. Moreover, it revealed yet again that Canadian soldiers have no lack of courage.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Foreword
9
Introduction
11
Photographic Inserts 1
49
Photographic Inserts 2
120
Epilogue
145
Notes
151
acknowledgements
193
Glossary of Abbreviations
195
Index
199
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Colonel Bernd Horn is an experienced Canadian Forces infantry officer. He is currently chief of staff of Strategic Training Education Programs at the Canadian Defence Academy. Dr. Horn is also an adjunct professor of history at the Royal Military College of Canada and has authored, co-authored, or edited 30 books. Some of his recent publications include Establishing a Legacy and The Military Leadership Handbook. He lives in Kingston, Ontario.

Bibliographic information