No Magic Bullet: Seven Steps to Better Performance

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American Society for Training and Development, Apr 1, 2009 - Business & Economics - 208 pages

Chances are you've tried many of the latest management fads in the hope that they'll give you a quick fix for troubling performance issues in your organization.

But there's a problem: those quick fixes don't bring effective long-term change. As emotionally appealing as the latest "magic bullet" theory may be, it's unlikely to address an important reality in most organizations: complexity. Change needs to be made in a logical, systemic way at different levels to be successful and sustainable. InNo Magic Bullet: Seven Steps to Better Performance, author Joe Willmore delivers seven steps to help you create serious performance improvements in your organization. His approach includes techniques and tips that help you

·         understand why quick fixes don't work

·         avoid "management fashion" fads

·         figure out if your organization thinks systemically

·         identify outstanding performers and start learning from them

·         focus on what really matters.

 

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Contents

Quick Fixes BandAids and Fads A Road Often Traveled
3
Getting Past the Five Myths of Employee Motivation and Performance
17
Step 1 Build in Accountability and Set Clear Compelling Goals
33
Step 2 Focus on What Matters
51
Step 3 Analyze Performance Gaps
71
Step 4 Choose Systemic Solutions Not Quick Fixes
95
Step 5 Learn from Your Best
115
Step 6 Give Feedback That Matters
133
Step 7 Implement Change to Support a HighPerforming Workforce
153
Directions for the Journey Getting from Here to There
171
References
187
Suggested Resources
191
About the Author
193
Index
195
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Joe Willmore is president of the Willmore Consulting Group, a performance consulting firm located near Washington, D.C. He has more than 35 years’ consulting experience with a wide range of clients, including the World Bank, Intelsat, Lockheed Martin, the U.S. Navy, Booz Allen Hamilton, and the Smithsonian Institution. He has served on ATD’s board of directors and held other leadership positions within ATD and other professional societies.

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