No More Words: A Journal of My Mother, Anne Morrow Lindbergh

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Simon and Schuster, Oct 15, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 176 pages
6 Reviews
In 1999 Anne Morrow Lindbergh, the famed aviator and author, moved from her home in Connecticut to the farm in Vermont where her daughter, Reeve, and Reeve's family live.
Mrs. Lindbergh was in her nineties and had been rendered nearly speechless years earlier by a series of small strokes that also left her frail and dependent on others for her care. No More Words is a moving and compassionate memoir by Reeve Lindbergh of the final seventeen months of her mother's life.
Reeve Lindbergh is an accomplished author who had learned to write in part by reading her mother's many books -- among them the international bestseller Gift from the Sea -- and also by absorbing her mother's careful and intimate way of examining the world around her. So Reeve's inability to communicate with her mother, a woman long recognized in her family and throughout the world as a gifted communicator, left her daughter deeply saddened and frustrated. Worse, from time to time Mrs. Lindbergh would offer a comment or observation that seemed harsh, shocking, or simply unrelated to the events around her, leaving Reeve anxious and distressed about what her mother might be thinking. Anyone who has had to care for an elderly parent disabled by Alzheimer's or stroke will understand immediately the heartache and anguish Reeve suffered.
Reeve writes with great sensitivity and sympathy for her mother's plight, while also analyzing her own conflicting feelings. Mrs. Lindbergh was fortunate to have full-time care, but a tremendous emotional burden still fell on Reeve. And even as she worried about her mother's long silences and enigmatic remarks, and monitored her daily care, Reeve had her husband and son to look after. But mixed with the sadness and responsibility were moments of humor and happiness, and even an eventual understanding, all the more treasured for being so unexpected.
No More Words is a tender tribute from daughter to mother, from one writer to another who was her model and mentor. It is a loving and poignant work, rich with insight into life's final stage.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Whisper1 - LibraryThing

What a wonderful book this is! In her later years, Anne Lindbergh's youngest child, her daughter Reeve, moved her to Vermont in order to give quality care. Building a house on the property of their ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bogopea - LibraryThing

Always fascinated with AML and her writings so was interested in the last stage of her life, living with her daughter in Vermont. AML actually has her own home on the farm Reeve shares with her ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
11
Section 3
13
Section 4
15
Section 5
32
Section 6
45
Section 7
60
Section 8
76
Section 10
101
Section 11
112
Section 12
124
Section 13
136
Section 14
147
Section 15
163
Section 16
170
Copyright

Section 9
88

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Popular passages

Page 19 - The moments of happiness - not the sense of well-being, Fruition, fulfilment, security or affection, Or even a very good dinner, but the sudden illumination We had the experience but missed the meaning, And approach to the meaning restores the experience In a different form, beyond any meaning We can assign to happiness.
Page 19 - We had the experience but missed the meaning, And approach to the meaning restores the experience In a different form beyond any meaning 38 JL Henderson We can assign to happiness.

About the author (2002)

Reeve Lindbergh is the author of several books for adults and children. They include the memoir of her childhood and youth, Under a WingNo More Words, a description of the last years of her mother, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, and Forward From Here, a memoir about entering her sixties. She lives with her husband, Nat Tripp, and several animals on a farm in northern Vermont.

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