No Nails, No Lumber: The Bubble Houses of Wallace Neff

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Chronicle Books, Dec 28, 2011 - Architecture - 168 pages
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Imagine a house constructed in less than forty-eight hours, without using lumber or nails, that is more resistant to fire, earthquakes, and hurricanes than any traditionally built structure. This may sound like the latest development in prefab housing or green architecture, but the design dates back to 1941 when architect Wallace Neff (1895 1982) developed Airform construction as a solution to the global housing crisis. Best known for his elegant Spanish Colonial revival estates in Southern California, Neff had a private passion for his dome-shaped "bubble houses" made of reinforced concrete cast in position over an inflatable balloon. No Nails, No Lumber shows the beauty and versatility of Neff 's design in new and vintage photography, previously unpublished illustrations, and archival material and ephemera.
 

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Contents

Foreword
8
Introduction
13
Falls ChurchVirginia
34
Litchfield Park Arizona
42
Loyola University California
52
Pacific Linen Supply Co
54
Andrew Neff House
60
South Pasadena California
68
Africa
114
Asia
122
Former Bubble House Residents
127
Patents of Wallace Ne
137
Selected Unbuilt AirformProjects 194458
146
Afterword
158
Acknowledgments
160
Notes
162

Hobe Sound Florida
72
Latin America
86
Europe
104
Selected Bibliography
165
Image Credits
168
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Jeffrey Head writes about art, architecture and design. He is based in Los Angeles, California. His writing is often based on historical research with a contemporary perspective. He has written for various publications including; The Architect's Newspaper, Architectural Record, Art & Living, Form, Metropolis, Modernism and The Los Angeles Times.

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