No Name in the Street

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Vintage Books, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 197 pages
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This stunningly personal document and extraordinary history of the turbulent sixties and early seventies displays James Baldwin's fury and despair more deeply than any of his other works.  In vivid detail he remembers the Harlem childhood that shaped his early conciousness, the later events that scored his heart with pain—the murders of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, his sojourns in Europe and in Hollywood, and his retum to the American South to confront a violent America face-to-face.
 

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NO NAME IN THE STREET

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

James Baldwin has come a long way since the days of Notes of a Native Son, when, in 1955, he wrote: "I love America more than any other country in the world; and exactly for this reason, I insist on ... Read full review

No Name in the Street

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Baldwin's 1972 volume is a right-between-the-eyes commentary on American racism in the 1950s and 1960s, capped by the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights figures. Still as powerful and important as the day it was written. Read full review

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About the author (2007)

James Baldwin was born in 1924 and educated in New York. He is the author of more than twenty works of fiction and nonfiction, including Go Tell It on the Mountain, Notes of a Native Son, Giovanni's Room, Nobody Knows My Name, Another Country, and The Fire Next Time. Among the awards he received are a Eugene F. Saxon Memorial Trust Award, a Rosenwald Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Partisan Review Fellowship, and a Ford Foundation grant. He was made a Commander of the Legion of Honor in 1986. Baldwin died in 1987.

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