No Place for Fairness: Indigenous Land Rights and Policy in the Bear Island Case and Beyond

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Oct 1, 2009 - Law
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Aboriginal land policy in Canada began as an Aboriginal initiative. In No Place for Fairness, David McNab - a long time advisor on land and treaty rights for both government and First Nations groups - looks at the Bear Island Indigenous rights case, initiated by the Teme-Augama Anishinabe, to explore why governments fail to deal effectively with Aboriginal land claims. The book, divided into two sections, includes a survey of the historical background of the Bear Island claim followed by a more personal series of reflections about what happened as the claim encountered decades of policy hurdles, court cases, public protests, and above all resistance by the Temagami First Nation. McNab provides details of how ministers and their senior officials resisted real efforts to resolve problems as well as examples of field staff resisting government attempts at resolution. He also shows that government entities such as the Indian Commission of Ontario and the Native Affairs Directorate were largely used as "mailboxes" where successive federal and provincial governments sent things they wanted to bury.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
1 Meeting Places and Negotiations 17631850s
10
2 First Nations and British Imperial Civilization Policy in the Early Nineteenth Century
20
3 Stories of TemeAugama Anishnabai Land Rights and the Robinson Huron Treaty of 1850 and Its Aftermath
39
Reflections on Ontario Aboriginal Policy and Processes 19761984
55
5 The Bear Island Trial the Steele Judgement and the First Settlement Offer 19821986
75
6 Bear Island and Land Rights under a Liberal Majority 19861988
90
7 The Temagami Blockade of 1988
111
9 Oka and the Blockades in Northern Ontario Summer 1990
152
10 Reflections since the 1990s
168
Towards a Place for Fairness
188
Acronyms
193
Notes
195
Bibliography
221
Index
233
Copyright

8 The 1989 Blockades and the 1990 Treaty of CoExistence
134

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About the author (2009)

David T. McNab is associate professor, Indigenous studies, York University. A Métis historian, he has worked on Indigenous rights in Canada for over thirty years.

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