No Star Too Beautiful: Yiddish Stories from 1382 to the Present

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Joachim Neugroschel
W. W. Norton & Company, 2004 - Fiction - 710 pages
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First developed and written in medieval Germany, Yiddish eventually became the everyday speech of Jews all over Europe and later globally. Yiddish was a hybrid language crafted from German, mixed with Hebrew, Judeo-Aramaic, and blended with Italian and French as well as the Slavic languages. It gave rise to a literature that reflected not only Jewish life but also the culture of the lands in which the Jews lived. A descriptive and flavorful language, it was used for genres as diverse as religious tales, fables, humor, social realism, surrealism, and the literary experiments of modern times. No Star Too Beautiful is a bountiful anthology that brings together the masterpieces of this now-vanishing tongue. Joachim Neugroschel has chosen stories emblematic of the people and their times, and this volume chronicles both the literary tradition and the history of the people who created it. Indeed, the collection contains the first English translation of medieval Yiddish fiction. Many of the early tales like "Virtuous Joseph" and "Abraham's Childhood" had Biblical roots. But there were also the fables of Moshe Vallikh and such wonder-filled folk tales as "The Princess and the Seven Geese." In the later periods, the stories reflect the varying currents of thought within the Jewish community as well as echoing the changes in Europe. Comic or tragic, Yiddish literature underwent a flowering of writers: Mendele Moykher-Sforim, Yitsik Leybesh Peretz, S. Ansky, Sholem Asch, Y.Y. and Isaac Bashevis Singer, and many others. Compiling and newly translating almost all the stories, Neugroschel has created a seamless effect rarely approached in a work filled with so many voices. This astounding anthology is a lasting gift for generations.
 

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No star too beautiful: Yiddish stories from 1382 to the present

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Neugroschel (Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult) has edited and translated this historic survey of Yiddish stories. Short stories, excerpts from novels, and some verse portray the great ... Read full review

Contents

Six Tales
39
House of the Sun from The Book of Miracles 1696 No 2
64
the Pious Jew from Memoirs 16911719
71
PART TWO HASIDISM AND ANTIHASIDISM
101
Parables
114
A Tale of a Kings Son
121
Fables early igth century
153
The Hasidic Boy Chapters 14 1867
175
The Encounter 1920
495
From a Letter from Barrack and War 1927
506
Hear O Israel 1926
512
He 1918
527
Apartment No Four 1914
534
The Woman in Chains Chapters 12 1919
540
The Story of Beautiful Marie 1921
546
Magda 1917
553

The Little Man or The Life Story
189
From The Jewish Muzhik 1894
238
The Crisis Chapters 13 1905
250
On the Stagecoach 1891
273
Mendel the Turk 1892
313
Seventyfive Thousand A Pack of Tsoris 1902
357
How Long Does a Pogrom Last? 1911
394
The Cross 1909
402
Two Roads 1922
416
In the Madhouse 1893
443
The Archbishop 1919
462
In the Mountains 1922
470
From The Golem
489
The Jew Who Destroyed the Temple 1917
563
Beheaded 1922
570
Canary 1922
583
The Open Grave 1937
596
Zelmenyaners Book I 1931
607
The Aunt from Norfolk
620
The End of the Road 1957
633
Zubak 1967
641
Dog Blood
656
The Dybbuk 1931
666
The Empire
679
Bociany Chapter i 2000
692
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Joachim Neugroschel was a well known literary translator (he translated French, German, Italian, Russian, Yiddish, and German). He also published poetry and was a poetry magazine founder. Neugroschel was born in Vienna on January 13, 1938. He grew up in New York City and graduated from Bronx Science in 1954, and Columbia University in 1958 with a degree in English and Comparative Literature. He moved to Europe and returned to New York six years later where he became a literary translator. Neugroschel was the winner of three PEN Translation Awards, the 1994 French-American Translation Prize, and the Guggenheim Fellowship in German Literature (1998). Neugroschel died on May 23, 2011 in Brooklyn, N.Y. He was 73.

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