No Constitutional Power to Conquer Foreign Nations and Hold Their People in Subjection Against Their Will: Speech of Hon. George F. Hoar, of Massachusetts, in the Senate of the United States, January 9, 1899

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publisher not identified, 1899 - United States - 28 pages
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Page 18 - Now, my friends, can this country be saved on that basis? If it can, I will consider myself one of the happiest men in the world if I can help to save it. If it cannot be saved upon that principle, it will be truly awful. But if this country cannot be saved without giving up that principle, I was about to say I would rather be assassinated on this spot than surrender it.
Page 17 - Don't you tell us all, once a year, that governments derive their just power from the consent of the governed?
Page 18 - I can say in return, sir, that all the political sentiments I entertain have been drawn, so far as I have been able to draw them, from the sentiments which originated in and were given to the world from this hall. I have never had a feeling, politically, that did not spring from the sentiments embodied in the Declaration of Independence.
Page 16 - When we consider the nature and the theory of our institutions of government, the principles upon which they are supposed to rest, and review the history of their development, we are constrained to conclude that they do not mean to leave room for the play and action of purely personal and arbitrary power.
Page 19 - This was their majestic interpretation of the economy of the universe. This was their lofty, and wise, and noble understanding of the justice of the Creator to His creatures. Yes, gentlemen, to all his creatures, to the whole great family of man.
Page 16 - ... is the thought and the spirit, and it is always safe to read the letter of the Constitution in the spirit of the Declaration of Independence.
Page 3 - That under the Constitution of the United States no power is given to the Federal Government to acquire territory to be held and governed permanently as colonies.
Page 19 - Wise statesmen as they were, they knew the tendency of prosperity to breed tyrants, and so they established these great self-evident truths, that when in the distant future some man, some faction, some interest, should set up the doctrine that none but rich men, none but white men, or none but Anglo-Saxon white men were entitled to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness...
Page 18 - But I have said nothing but what I am willing to live by, and, if it be the pleasure of Almighty God, to die by.
Page 6 - government derives its just power from the consent of the governed...

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