"Noh", Or, Accomplishment: A Study of the Classical Stage of Japan

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Macmillan, 1916 - English drama - 267 pages
 

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Page 45 - This intensification of the Image, this manner of construction, is very interesting to me personally, as an Imagiste, for we Imagistes knew nothing of these plays when we set out in our own manner. These plays are also an answer to a question that has several times been put to me : " Could one do 'a long Imagiste poem, or even a long poem in vers libre...
Page 136 - Again they are like an unfinished cloth: "these bodies, having no weft, even now are not come together, truly a shameful story, a tale to bring shame on the gods. ' ' Before they can bring the priest to the tomb they spend the day "pushing aside the grass from the overgrown ways in Kefu...
Page 149 - We ask you, do not awake, We all will wither away, The wands and this cloth of a dream. Now you will come out of sleep, You tread the border and nothing Awaits you : no, all this will wither away. There is nothing here but this cave in the field's midst. To-day's wind moves in the pines ; A wild place, unlit, and unfilled.
Page 120 - Noh lie in the concentration. All elements — costume, motion, verse and music —unite to produce a single clarified impression. Each drama embodies some primary human relation or emotion; and the poetic sweetness or poignancy of this is carried to its highest degree by carefully excluding all such obtrusive elements as a mimetic realism or vulgar sensation might demand.
Page 3 - THE life of Ernest Fenollosa was the romance par excellence of modern scholarship. He went to Japan as a professor of economics. He ended as Imperial Commissioner of Arts. He had unearthed treasure that no Japanese had heard of. It may be an exaggeration to say that he had saved Japanese art for Japan, but it is certain that he had done as much as any one man could have to set the native art in its rightful pre-eminence and to stop the apeing of Europe. He had endeared himself to the government and...
Page 23 - She wanders, a poor, daft shadow. [I cannot quite make out whether the priest is still sceptical, and thinks he has before him merely an old woman who thinks she is Komachi. At any rate, she does not want commiseration, and replies.] ONO Daft! Will you hear him? In my own young days I had a hundred letters from men a sight better than he is. They came like rain-drops in May. And I had a high head, may be, that time. And I sent out no answer. You think because you see me alone now that I was in want...
Page 132 - We neither wake nor sleep, and passing our nights in a sorrow which is in the end a vision, what are these scenes of spring to us ? this thinking in sleep of some one who has no thought of you, is it more than a dream ? and yet surely it is the natural way of love. In our hearts there is much and in our bodies nothing, and we do nothing at all, and only the waters of the river of tears flow quickly.
Page 197 - ... of Awoi's jealousy. The passion makes her subject to the demon-possession. The demon first comes in a disguised and beautiful form. The prayer of the exorcist forces him first to appear in his true shape, and then to retreat. But the "disguised and beautiful form" is not a mere abstract sheet of matter.
Page 3 - Japan as a professor of economics. He ended as Imperial Commissioner of Arts. He had unearthed treasure that no Japanese had heard of. It may be an exaggeration to say that he had saved Japanese art for Japan, but it is certain that he had done as much as any one man could have to set the native art in its rightful preeminence and to stop the apeing of Europe. He had endeared himself to the government and laid the basis for a personal tradition. When he died suddenly in England the Japanese government...
Page 187 - He thought, how easy this killing. He rushed with his spearhaft gripped under his arm. He cried out, "I am Kagekiyo of the Heike." He rushed on to take them. He pierced through the helmet vizards of Miyonoya. Miyonoya fled twice, and again; and Kagekiyo cried: "You shall not escape me!" He leaped and wrenched off his helmet. "Eya!" The vizard broke and remained in his hand and Miyonoya still fled afar, and afar, and he looked back crying in terror, "How terrible, how heavy your arm!" And Kagekiyo...

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