Noise and Spirit: The Religious and Spiritual Sensibilities of Rap Music

Front Cover
Anthony B. Pinn
NYU Press, Nov 1, 2003 - Music - 214 pages
0 Reviews

Rap music is often seen as a Black secular response to pressing issues of our time. Yet, like spirituals, the blues, and gospel music, rap has deep connections to African American religious traditions.

Noise and Spirit explores the diverse religious dimensions of rap stemming from Islam (including the Nation of Islam and Five Percent Nation), Rastafarianism, and Humanism, as well as Christianity. The volume examines rap’s dialogue with religious traditions, from the ways in which Islamic rap music is used as a method of religious and political instruction to the uses of both the blues and Black women’s rap for considering the distinction between God and the Devil.

The first section explores rap’s association with more easily recognizable religious traditions and communities such as Christianity and Islam. The next presents discussions of rap and important spiritual considerations, including on the topic of death. The final unit wrestles with ways to theologize about the relationship between the sacred and the profane in rap.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Facing Truth
29
The Evolution of African American
49
Sounds of Cultural Dissonance
71
Exploring Raps Humanist
85
Rap as Spiritual Practice
107
North American Popular
131
Markets Morals and the Theologizing of Music
173
The Emergence of
184
Selected Bibliography
193
About the Contributors
201
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

Anthony B. Pinn is Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities and Professor of Religious Studies at Rice University, where he also serves as the executive director of the Society for the Study of Black Religion. His books include Varieties of African-American Religious Experience, Why Lord?: Suffering and Evil in Black Theology, and By These Hands: A Documentary History of African-American Humanism (NYU Press, 2001).

Bibliographic information