Nomenclature of Cities and Towns in the United States: Lecture of David Dudley Field, Before the American Geographical Society, February 26, 1885

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M.B. Brown, 1885 - Names, Geographical - 15 pages
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Page 5 - Not Babylon Nor great Alcairo such magnificence Equalled in all their glories, to enshrine Belus or Serapis their gods, or seat Their kings, when Egypt with Assyria strove In wealth and luxury.
Page 8 - We stand a small island in the bosom of the great waters. We are encircled, — we are encompassed. The evil spirit rides upon the blast, and the waters are disturbed. They rise, they press upon us, and the waves once settled over us, we disappear forever. Who then lives to mourn us ? None. What marks our extermination ? Nothing. We are mingled with the common elements."* The history of this mission of the orator is necessarily very imperfect.
Page 12 - Tyrus, thou hast said, I am of perfect beauty. Thy borders are in the midst of the seas, thy builders have perfected thy beauty.
Page 12 - O thou that art situate at the entry of the sea, which art a merchant of the people for many isles, thus saith the Lord God; O Tyrus, thou hast said, I am of perfect beauty.
Page 5 - The roof was fretted gold. Not Babylon, Nor great Alcairo, such magnificence Equall'd in all their glories...
Page 8 - We stand, a small island in the bosom of the great waters. We are encircled — we are encompassed. The evil spirit rides upon the blast, and the waters are disturbed. They rise ; they press upon us ; and the waves once settled over us we disappear forever. Who, then, lives to mourn us ? None. What marks our extermination ? Nothing. We are mingled with the common elements.
Page 4 - Our happiness depends a great deal upon the places in which we live, and the pleasure or pain they give is affected by the names we know them by. We are told that Hood went to a school kept by two maiden sisters named Hogsflesh. They had a brother who would be addressed only as Mr. H. He was right. Yet one would as soon receive a letter addressed to him as Hogsflesh, as one addressed to him in Hogspen.
Page 12 - ... which are wholly Dutch. France has her own, handed down from the Franks. In Italy and Spain the names are partly Roman and partly the gifts of invaders. Germany and Switzerland have names which are histories. Denmark and Sweden owe theirs — soft and musical they are — to the Goths and Vandals. And Russia, Poland and Bohemia, harsh as many of them appear to us, have at least those which are significant to the Sclavonic races. But here what an admixture of Greek and Roman, English, French,...
Page 8 - Capetown, Longmeadow, Cherry Valley. So might the name of a founder or prominent inhabitant be taken with an English termination, as Jamestown, Williamstown, Charlestown. But by all means avoid terminations that do not belong to our language. Banish " ville " altogether. It is not English, but French, and only French. It does not fit well with our names. Indeed, it disfigures whatever it touches, making the good bad, and the bad worse. To use it is vilification.
Page 4 - Columbia" as our national song, while British Columbia flanks us on the northwest and the United States of Colombia face us from the Isthmus of Darien. We visit Niagara and cross from the American to the Canadian side of the great cataract. If we pass beyond the equator, we find a group of republics, all calling themselves American. An enterprising countryman proposes to build a railway from the northmost to the southmost countries of this hemisphere, and to call it the Three Americas Railway. I...

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