Nonlinear: A Field Guide to Digital Film and Video Editing

Front Cover
Triad Publishing, Jan 1, 2000 - Art - 413 pages
0 Reviews
Nonlinear, now in its 4th edition, is an easy-to-understand handbook about the popular world of digital nonlinear editing. Its written in nontechnical language for both professionals and students, as well as for interested bystanders. Profusely illustrated. The first edition was designed for professionals in Hollywoods film and video industry, to bridge the chasm between film editors (older, non-technological, mechanical), videotape editors (younger, highly technical, electronic), and computer users (prosumers, cost-conscious, digital) in casual language. Today, Nonlinear has not only penetrated the professional industry, but has been expanded for consumer use. Widely used in colleges, universities, and professional organizations. Although nonlinear editing technology began to explode in 1991, nonlinear systems had already been around for almost 5 years. Nonlinear became the Rosetta Stone of the industry: it was a universal translator -- between film and video, video and computer, computer and film. It still covers virtually everything anyone would want to know about the new world of electronic post production, without the geeky mumbo jumbo that characterizes most professional texts. While the book is useful for anyone investigating or wishing to purchase a digital editing system, it is not meant to be a buyers guide. It is designed not to go out of date every time a new new product is introduced or software release comes out. It is about essentials. Fundamentals. Concepts. And language. With over 25,000 copies in print, Nonlinear is the best selling textbook on nonlinear editing in the world today.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

First Things
1
Background
19
Fundamentals
77
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Patrick Clawson is Deputy Director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Michael Rubin is Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. Between 2002 and 2004, he worked as a staff advisor for Iran and Iraq in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Bibliographic information