Norman's Universal Cambist: A Ready Reckoner of the World's Foreign and Colonial Exchanges of Seven Monetary and Currency Intermediaries

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E. Wilson, 1897 - Foreign exchange - 275 pages
 

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Page xiv - Country abounds, and what be the wares which they want, and how and from whence they are furnished with the same. 5. He ought to understand, and to be a diligent observer of the rates of Exchanges by Bills, from one State to another, whereby he may the better direct his affairs, and remit over and receive home his Monies to the most advantage possible.
Page vii - On this cardinal fact all understanding of what money is hangs. The whole battle with the bimetallists turns upon it. To buy is to exchange one thing for another on the basis of the value of the one being equal to that of the other. But what is the quantity of value which each possesses t That is the critical point.
Page xxi - That the study of the economic phenomena of society ought to be systematically combined with that of the other aspects of social existence; (2) That the excessive tendency to abstraction and to unreal simplifications should be checked; (3) That the a priori deductive method should be changed for the historical...
Page xxi - ... away from any relation to fact, and lose themselves in a region of nebulous metaphysics ; so that exact thinkers have felt themselves obliged to abandon the use of some of the most necessary terms, such as value, utility, production, and to express the ideas they attach to them by circuitous phrases. I am far from condemning the effort after accuracy of language and well-defined terms ; but the endless fluctuations of economists in the use of words (of which numerous examples are given in Senior's...
Page 136 - ... after life be practically conversant, and in which no class of men, from the highest to the lowest, can, in such a country as this at least, be safely left in ignorance or in error.
Page 264 - System for determining the par value of all Moneys of Account, and Gold and Silver Coins...
Page 6 - Have you made up your mind upon the truth or falsehood of these two propositions? (a) Gold and silver are different substances,. \ (b) No two different substances can be exchanged for any length of time on parallel lines of quantities or values, neither can they be produced for any length of time upon parallel lines of cost.
Page xiv - Countrey. 12. Lastly, although there be no necessity that such a Merchant should be a great Scholar ; yet is it (at least) required, that in his youth he learn the Latine tongue, which will the better enable him in all the rest of his endeavours. Thus have I briefly...
Page vii - ... unexplained. We obtain that explanation by saying that the value of the money is calculated in the same way as that of the article bought. The amount of the money given is determined by the cost of producing the metal, precisely as the price of a coat or a loaf of bread is determined by what they cost to produce. The quantities of the metal and the commodity exchanged are regulated in the same way. As Aristotle pointed out, gold, money, is chosen simply as one of many commodities. The cost of...
Page xxi - These are, in my opinion," he says, "the great reforms " which are required both in the conduct of economic research and " in the exposition of its conclusions." He then proceeded to say that " if the proper study of mankind is man...

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