North and South

Front Cover
Penguin, 1995 - Fiction - 450 pages
7 Reviews

Elizabeth Gaskell's best-known work: a novel of profound originality, feeling, and social concern

When her father leaves the Church in a crisis of conscience, Margaret Hale is uprooted from her comfortable home in Hampshire to move with her family to the north of England. Initially repulsed by the ugliness of her new surroundings in the industrial town of Milton, Margaret becomes aware of the poverty and suffering of the local mill workers and develops a passionate sense of social justice. This is intensified by her tempestuous relationship with the mill-owner and self-made man, John Thornton, as their fierce opposition over his treatment of his employees masks a deeper attraction. In North and South, Elizabeth Gaskell skillfully fused individual feeling with social concern, and in Margaret Hale created one of the most original heroines of Victorian literature.

In her introduction Patricia Ingham examines geographical, economic and class differences, and male and female roles in North and South. This edition also includes a list for further reading, notes and a glossary.

For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


 

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User Review  - VeritysVeranda - LibraryThing

Four stars for a work of fiction that is set in a world which can still resonate with the events in the world today, characters who have meaningful conversations/arguements and the lovers have a happy ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Annesanse - LibraryThing

I read this book mainly because I found and LOVED the mini series based on it on Netflix. I have to say that this is one of those rare exceptions where I like the movie more than the book. While the ... Read full review

Contents

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
vii
CHRONOLOGY
viii
INTRODUCTION
xii
FURTHER READING
xxx
NOTE ON THE TEXT
xxxii
NORTH AND SOUTH
1
Haste to the Wedding
7
Roses and Thorns
16
Mother and Son
204
Fruitpiece
209
Comfort in Sorrow
215
A Ray of Sunshine
230
Home at Last
235
Should Auld Acquaintance be Forgot?
246
Mischances
256
Peace
260

The More Haste the Worse Speed
24
Doubts and Difficulties
33
V Decision
42
Farewell
53
New Scenes and Faces
59
Home Sickness
66
Dressing for Tea
75
Wrought Iron and Gold
79
First Impressions
87
Morning Calls
94
A Soft Breeze in a Sultry Place
99
The Meeting
105
Masters and Men
110
The Shadow of Death
124
What is a Strike?
131
Likes and Dislikes
138
Angel Visits
146
Men and Gentlemen
156
The Dark Night
164
A Blow and Its Consequences
171
Mistakes
183
Mistakes Cleared Up
190
Frederick
195
False and True
265
Expiation
270
Union Not Always Strength
283
Looking South
293
Promises Fulfilled
302
Making Friends
314
Out of Tune
322
The Journeys End
334
Alone Alone
345
Margarets Flittin
355
Ease Not Peace
363
Not All a Dream
372
Once and Now
375
Something Wanting
392
Neer to be Found Again
397
Breathing Tranquillity
402
Changes at Milton
407
Meeting Again
416
Pack Clouds Away
422
NOTES
426
GLOSSARY
450
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was born in London in 1810, but she spent her formative years in Cheshire, Stratford-upon-Avon and the north of England. In 1832 she married the Reverend William Gaskell, who became well known as the minister of the Unitarian Chapel in Manchester's Cross Street. As well as leading a busy domestic life as minister's wife and mother of four daughters, she worked among the poor, traveled frequently and wrote. Mary Barton (1848) was her first success.

Two years later she began writing for Dickens's magazine, Household Words, to which she contributed fiction for the next thirteen years, notably a further industrial novel, North and South (1855). In 1850 she met and secured the friendship of Charlotte Brontė. After Charlotte's death in March 1855, Patrick Brontė chose his daughter's friend and fellow-novelist to write The Life of Charlotte Brontė (1857), a probing and sympathetic account, that has attained classic stature. Elizabeth Gaskell's position as a clergyman's wife and as a successful writer introduced her to a wide circle of friends, both from the professional world of Manchester and from the larger literary world. Her output was substantial and completely professional. Dickens discovered her resilient strength of character when trying to impose his views on her as editor of Household Words. She proved that she was not to be bullied, even by such a strong-willed man.

Her later works, Sylvia's Lovers (1863), Cousin Phillis (1864) and Wives and Daughters (1866) reveal that she was continuing to develop her writing in new literary directions. Elizabeth Gaskell died suddenly in November 1865.

Patricia Ingham is senior research fellow and reader at St. Anne's College, Oxford. She is the general editor of Thomas Hardy's fiction in Penguin Classics and edited Gaskell's North and South for the series.


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