Northern Campaigns, from the Commencement of the War in 1812, to the Armistice Signed and Ratified June 4, 1813: With an Appendix, Containing All the Bulletins Issued by the French Ruler During this Contest, Etc, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 195 - Keep innocency, and take heed unto the thing that is right : for that shall bring a man peace at the last.
Page 19 - His Majesty caused the following proclamation to be inserted in the Orders of the Army : " SOLDIERS ! — The second war of Poland \ has commenced. The first was brought to a close at Friedland and Tilsit. At Tilsit, Russia swore eternal alliance with France, and war with England. She now violates her oaths. She refuses to give...
Page 195 - It would seem that with the blood which flowed, her spirit of bravery increased ; that the burning villages animated her patriotism, and the destruction and profanation of the temples of God strengthened her faith, and nourished in her the sentiment of implacable revenge. The army, the nobility, the gentry, the clergy, the merchants, the people, in a word, all classes, all estates of the empire, neither...
Page 84 - Neither innocent childhood, nor helpless old age ; neither youth, sex, rank, nor beauty could disarm the fury of the conquerors. Wives were abused in the arms of their husbands, daughters at the feet of their parents ; and the defenceless sex exposed to the double sacrifice of virtue and life.
Page 254 - France, who is beauteous and strong through herself, occupy hepself, in future, in promoting her internal welfare ! No foreign power intends disturbing it — no hostile power shall be sent against her rightful frontiers. But be it known to France, that the other powers are solicitous of conquering lasting tranquillity for their subjects, and that they will not lay down their arms until the foundation of the independence of every European state has been established and secured.
Page 161 - We have besides, and with heartfelt satisfaction, perceived by the reports of the commander-in-chief of the armies, and from other generals, that in several governments, and particularly in those of Moscow and Kalouga, the country people have armed themselves, chosen their own leaders, and not only resisted all attempts at seducing them, but also sustained all the calamities that have befallen them with the perseverance of martyrs. Often have they united themselves with our detachments, and assisted...
Page 197 - ... pieces, exclusive of those buried or thrown into the water, which have been recovered, and are now in our hands. The scene of the destruction of his armies surpasses all belief. One almost imagines that our eyes deceive us. Who has been able to effect this ? Without derogating from the merited glory of the Commander-in-Chief of our armies, this distinguished General, who has rendered to his country...
Page 250 - ... in our power. Supply the reasonable wants of our warriors, and in return expect from us the strictest discipline. Every application to me, the Prussian General, may be freely made by all oppressed persons.
Page 249 - Every following treaty increased the hard conditions of lie preceding one. For this reason, we have thrown off the shameful yoke, and advance to the heart-cheering combat for our liberty. " Saxons ! — Ye are a noble enlightened people ! You know that, without independence, all the good things of this life are, to noble minds, of little value ; that subjection is the greatest disgrace. You neither can nor will bear slavery any longer. You will no longer permit a cunning and deceitful system of policy...
Page 312 - Although the numerous villages lying near to each other in this territory, and its canals, together with the precaution taken by the enemy never to appear in the open plain, did not afford our cavalry an opportunity of charging in line, yet the Prussian Garde-du-corps, and the regiment of...

Bibliographic information