Northwood; a Tale of New England, Volume 1

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Bowles & Dearborn, 1827
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Contents

I
3
II
12
III
19
IV
29
V
48
VI
70
VII
87
VIII
106
X
141
XI
159
XII
170
XIII
190
XIV
209
XV
221
XVI
231
XVII
244

IX
119

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Page 74 - Needs not the foreign aid of ornament, But is, when unadorned, adorned the most." They were, indeed, beautiful girls—the Romelees were a comely race—and every fair reader who honors these pages with a perusal, and does not think them, at least, as handsome as herself, may be certain she possesses either a vain head or an envious heart.
Page 111 - Though fools spurn Hymen's gentle powers^ Those who improve his golden hours By sweet experience know, That marriage, rightly understood, Gives to the tender and the good A Paradise below." [Cotton. The house of Deacon Jones was a tolerably fair specimen of Yankee architecture. A genuine Yankee consults no order save the order of his own will;
Page 159 - On with the dance! let joy be unconfined; No sleep till mom, when youth and pleasure meet To chase the glowing hours with flying feet.
Page 64 - with a long sweep, his horse seemed to know, instinctively, the road homewards, and set off with a furious clatter. CHAPTER VI. "All hail, ye tender feelings, dear! The smile of love, the friendly tear, The sympathetic glow." [Burns. The house, before which our travellers now stood, was a
Page 25 - She either gives a stomach, and no food— Such are the poor in health; or else a feast, And takes away the stomach; such the rich, That have abundance and enjoy it not.
Page 81 - All has its date below; the fatal hour Was registered in heaven ere time began. We turn to dust, and all our mighty works Die too; the deep foundations that we lay, Time ploughs them up, and not a trace remains.
Page 218 - thinkest I am too quickly won, I'll frown, and be perverse, and say thee nay, So thou wilt woo; but else not for the world.
Page 42 - labor, useful life, Progressive virtue and approving heaven, These are the matchless joys of virtuous love." And these, for nearly thirteen years succeeding the departure of their son, they enjoyed in as perfect a degree as the nature of humanity will permit.
Page 210 - Thou hast the secret of my heart; Forgive, be generous, and depart." [Lady of the Lake. The moment breakfast was finished on the following morning, Sidney seized his hat and hurried into the street, and continued sauntering through the city during the whole forenoon. He would not
Page 218 - Dost thou love me"? I know thou wilt say aye, And I will take thy word.— Yet if thou thinkest I am too quickly won, I'll frown, and be perverse, and say thee nay, So thou wilt woo; but else not for the world.

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