Not Without Laughter

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 299 pages
Although best known as a poet and pioneer of the Harlem Renaissance movement, Langston Hughes proves himself one of modern literature’s most revered and versatile African-American authors with Not Without Laughter, a powerful classic novel.

This is a moving portrait of African-American family life in 1930s Kansas, following young Sandy Rogers as he comes of age. Sandy’s mother, Annjee, works as a housekeeper for a rich white family, while his father, traverses the country in search of work.

Not Without Laughter is a moving examination of growing up in a racially divided society. A rich and important work, Hughes deftly echoes the black American experience with this novel.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
3
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kmstock - LibraryThing

Still brilliant after all these years, and gives more insight into the lives of black people back then (1930s) than most other books of this kind. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bookwoman247 - LibraryThing

I had no idea that Langston Hughes had written a novel. I really enjoy his poetry, so I was very excited to find this book. It is the coming-of-age story of an Africa American boy in Kansas during the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
9
Foreword
11
Storm
19
Conversation
30
Jimboys Letter
42
Thursday Afternoon
49
Guitar
59
Work
70
Nothing but Love
178
BarberShop
185
Childrens Day
194
Ten Dollars and Costs
203
Hey Boy
208
Note to Harriett
217
Beyond the Jordan
228
Tempys House
234

White Folks
79
Dance
91
Carnival
109
Punishment
121
School
128
Hard Winter
135
Christmas
148
Return
161
One by One
168
A Shelf of Books
241
Pool Hall
247
The Doors of Life
255
Beware of Women
262
Chicago
273
Elevator
286
Princess of the Blues
291
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1995)

Langston Hughes (1902–1967) was born in Joplin, Missouri, and lived much of his life in Harlem, New York. As one America’s most cherished chroniclers of the black experience, known for his work during the Harlem Renaissance, Hughes’s work was constantly groundbreaking throughout his forty-six-year career. His poetry about the ocean and the symbolism that surrounds it stems from his travels through Africa and Europe working as a seaman.