Not Remotely Controlled: Notes on Television

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Basic Books, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 353 pages
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Television has taken firm hold of American life ever since the first flickering images replaced the disembodied voices innocently crackling from the radio. Ever present and evolving, television thrives at the crossroads of commerce, art, and entertainment. In Not Remotely Controlled cultural critic Lee Siegel collects his reportage and musings on this most hybrid medium. Whether chronicling the history of the "cop” drama, revealing the inherent irony in Donald Trump’s character on "The Apprentice,” or shedding light on those unheralded gems that Neilsen ratings swept away prematurely, Siegel gives each episode, series, or documentary the attention and respect usually reserved for high-art and dusty literature. Going far beyond mere pans and praise, Siegel has given long-overdue attention to America’s most pervasive art form: television.

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NOT REMOTELY CONTROLLED: Notes on Television

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Hit-and-mostly-miss collection of 50-plus New Republic essays over-intellectualizing the boob tube's not particularly intellectual output.As the magazine's television reporter from 2003 to 2006 ... Read full review

Not remotely controlled: notes on television

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Siegel (Falling Upwards: Essays in Defense of the Imagination ) informally reflects on all aspects of television-as art form, a cultural and business phenomenon, and sociological/psychological ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Friends
40
Jon Stewart
58
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Lee Siegel is a renowned critic and essayist whose writing appears in Harper's, The New Republic, Time, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker, among other publications. He received the 2002 National Magazine Award for Reviews and Criticism. He is the author of Falling Upwards. Siegel is a senior editor at The New Republic. He lives with his wife and child in New York City.

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