Notes and Thoughts on Gardens and Woodlands: Written Chiefly for Amateurs

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Macmillan, 1881 - Floriculture - 312 pages
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Page vii - A garden is a beautiful book, writ by the finger of God ; every flower and every leaf is a letter. You have only to learn them — and he is a poor dunce that cannot, if he will, do that — to learn them and join them, and then to go on reading and reading, and you will find yourself carried away from the earth to the skies by the beautiful story you are going through.
Page 72 - By bud of nobler race : this is an art Which does mend nature, change it rather, but The art itself is nature.
Page 134 - O'erlooking all his waving snares around Near the dire cell the dreadless wanderer oft Passes ; as oft the ruffian shows his front. The prey at last ensnared, he dreadful darts, With rapid glide, along the leaning line...
Page vii - ... go on reading and reading, and you will find yourself carried away from the earth to the skies by the beautiful story you are going through. You do not know what beautiful thoughts — for they are nothing short — grow out of the ground, and seem to talk to a man.
Page vii - You do not know what beautiful thoughts grow out of the ground, and seem to talk to a man. And then there are some flowers that seem to me like overdutiful children : tend them but ever so little, and they come up and flourish, and show, as I may say, their bright and happy faces to you.
Page 126 - ... Poplar on the banks of the Po, no doubt, has the same effect among its deciduous brethren, by forming the apex of a clump, though I have been told that in its age it loses its shape in some degree, and spreads more into a head. One beauty the Italian Poplar possesses, which is almost peculiar to itself, and that is, the waving line it forms when agitated by wind; most trees in this circumstance are partially agitated, one side is at rest while the other is in motion ; but the Italian Poplar waves...
Page 38 - Ceriman spreads its huge leaves, latticed and forked again and again. So fast do they grow, that they have not time to fill up the spaces between their nerves, and are consequently full of oval holes...
Page 134 - A TEMPLE to Friendship," said Laura, enchanted, " I '11 build in this garden — the thought is divine !" Her temple was built, and she now only wanted An image of friendship to place on the shrine. She flew to a sculptor, who set down before her A Friendship, the fairest his art could invent, But so cold and so dull, that the youthful adorer Saw plainly this was not the idol she meant.
Page 21 - ... find four hours a day devoted to practical work; in another, two. As I read this allocation of time, the advice of the botanist de Candolle to Mrs. Somerville comes forcibly to my mind, and she, be it remembered, was not being prepared to be a professional gardener. " I advise you above all things to see the plants at all their ages, to follow their growth, to describe them in detail, in a word, to live with them more than with books.
Page 134 - White Cross " spider settled in the baskets of mixed plants in the rooms. If the web was destroyed when we left the room at night, by the morning he had a new one completed in another plant all ready. " In eager watch he sits, O'erlooking all his waving snares around. The prey at last ensnared he dreadful darts With rapid glide along the leaning line.

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