Notes on the Mint-towns and Coins of the Mohamedans from the Earliest Period of the Present Time: With Map and a Table Showing the Dinars, Dirhems and Fulus of the Amawee and Abasee Khaleefehs from the Year 79 to 332 A.H.

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Stevens & sons, 1885 - Gazetteers - 110 pages
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Page 59 - During the occupation of the peninsula by the Arabs the place served as a frontier town, and its castle was often taken from the Arabs and retaken by them until 1086, when it was finally taken by Alphonso VI., the conqueror of Toledo, who annexed it to the bishopric of Toledo, to which it now belongs. It continued to be a mere village until the reign of Henry III. of Castile, who, being passionately fond of...
Page 4 - Ahwuz occupies but a small portion of the site of the old city, on the eastern bank of the Karun, and exhibits a mean and solitary appearance when contrasted with the immense mass of ruins. Its houses are almost entirely built of stone brought from the ruins, and it can only boast of one decent building, a mosque, apparently modern. The population at present does not exceed 1600 souls.
Page 32 - European adventure. The ancient metropolis of a once mighty race, the only permanent settlement in Eastern Africa, the reported seat of Moslem learning, a walled city of stone houses, possessing its independent chief, its peculiar population, its unknown language, and its own coinage, the emporium of the coffee trade, the head-quarters of slavery, the birth-place of the Kat plant, 3 and the great manufactory of cotton-cloths, amply, it appeared, deserved the trouble of exploration.
Page iv - Greeks, who made a voluntary sacrifice of truth to the delicacy of their ears, appear to have altered by design almost all the oriental names, which they introduced into their elegant, but romantick histories...
Page 44 - ... laying the foundations of the city-wall. They were to have given a signal at that precise moment by ringing a number of bells, which were suspended to cords supported by poles along the whole circumference of the intended wall; but a raven happening to alight upon one of the cords, the bells were put in motion before the chosen time; and the builders, who were waiting for the signal, immediately commenced their work. Thus the city was founded at an inauspicious, instead of a fortunate, moment.•...
Page 57 - Muhammadan buildings, which yet remain in a tolerable state of preservation. When the Afghdn kings of Bengal established their independence, they transferred the seat of government to PANDUAH...
Page 44 - El-Kahireh/ whence the Italianized name Cairo. It was founded at night. Astrologers had been consulted and had fixed on a propitious moment for laying the foundations of the city-wall. They were to have given a signal at that precise moment by ringing a number of bells, which were suspended to cords supported by poles, along the whole circumference of the intended wall; but a raven happening to alight upon one of the cords, the bells were put in motion before the chosen time; and the builders, who...
Page 3 - E. long. It was originally an inconsiderable village, but in the beginning of the sixteenth century was much enlarged by the Emperor Sekunder Lody, who bestowed on it the rank of an imperial city and made it the capital of his dominions, under the name of Badulghur. Half a century later, the city was further enlarged by the Emperor Akbar, who built here an extensive palace, and again changed its name to Akbarabad. This city continued to be the seat of the Mogul government until the year 1647, when...
Page 90 - Tdngrf).—1am\ in Maldah District, Bengal. The ancient capital of Bengal after the decadence of GAUR. Its history is obscure, and the very site of the city has not been accurately determined. It is certain that it was in the immediate neighbourhood of Gaur, and west of that town, beyond the Bhdgirathf.
Page 50 - Mohammed Khan, by whom its male inhabitants were slaughtered or horribly mutilated, — its women and children given over to the most revolting slavery, — its buildings and fortifications destroyed. To commemorate this final blow to the fortunes of his adversary, the victor resolved to erect a trophy worthy of the event. Selecting from his captives 900 men, he decapitated 600, and forced the survivors to carry the gory heads of their comrades to...

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