Nothing Like the Sun: A Story of Shakespeare's Love-life

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1996 - Fiction - 234 pages
1 Review
"Nothing Like the Sun" is a magnificent, bawdy telling of Shakespeare's love life. Starting with the young Will, the novel is a romp that follows Will's maturation into sex and writing. It is at the same time a serious look at the forces that midwife art, the effects of time and place, and the ordinariness that is found side by side with the extraordinariness of genius.
 

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Review: Nothing Like the Sun: A Story of Shakespeare's Love-Life

User Review  - John Yeoman - Goodreads

A carnival of language! Burgess had a life-long love affair with words, as witness A Clockwork Orange, and this glorious pastiche of 16thc idioms is a poem to the Bard. Forgive the copious in-jokes ... Read full review

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Contents

I
3
II
11
III
16
IV
23
V
31
VI
38
VII
46
VIII
54
XII
95
XIII
105
XIV
119
XV
133
XVI
144
XVII
160
XVIII
176
XIX
192

IX
61
X
68
XI
79
XX
206
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About the author (1996)

Anthony Burgess was born in 1917 in Manchester, England. He studied language at Xaverian College and Manchester University. He had originally applied for a degree in music, but was unable to pass the entrance exams. Burgess considered himself a composer first, one who later turned to literature. Burgess' first novel, A Vision of Battlements (1964), was based on his experiences serving in the British Army. He is perhaps best known for his novel A Clockwork Orange, which was later made into a movie by Stanley Kubrick. In addition to publishing several works of fiction, Burgess also published literary criticism and a linguistics primer. Some of his other titles include The Pianoplayers, This Man and Music, Enderby, The Kingdom of the Wicked, and Little Wilson and Big God. Burgess was living in Monaco when he died in 1993.

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