Novels and Arguments: Inventing Rhetorical Criticism

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University of Chicago Press, 1982 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 260 pages
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In this absorbing study—the first comprehensive exploration of the rhetoric of the novel—Zahava Karl McKeon investigates the complex interrelations of critical poetics, grammars, dialectics, and rhetorics to devise a systematic means of dealing with the structure of prose works as communicative objects. Using the vocabulary and conceptual resources of Aristotle and Cicero, she pursues this exploration to discover the kinds of arguments that characterize novels, to find a way of distinguishing novels from other discursive wholes, and to discriminate different genres of the novel. McKeon's arguments are supplemented by readings of a variety of texts, including the novels and stories of Gunter Grass, John Fowles, Robert Coover, and Flannery O'Connor.
 

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Contents

TWO About Fictive Argument
23
THREE Making Fictive Arguments
40
FOUR Making Discursive Wholes
58
SEVEN NovelsQualitative
130
A Discussion
177
NINE Conclusion
229
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About the author (1982)

Zahava Karl McKeon is associate professor of English at DePaul University.

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