Novels and Novelists: From Elizabeth to Victoria, Volume 1

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Page 133 - Will you not allow, Sir, that he draws very natural pictures of human life ?" JOHNSON : " Why, Sir, it is of very low life. Richardson used to say, that had he not known who Fielding was, he should have believed he was an ostler.
Page 81 - A True Relation of the Apparition of one Mrs. Veal, the next Day after her Death, to one Mrs Bargrave, at Canterbury, the 8th of September 1705 ; which Apparition recommends the perusal of Drelincourfs Book of Consolation against the Fear of Death.
Page 147 - In the month of May, the Duke of Cumberland advanced with the army into the Highlands, as far as Fort Augustus, where he encamped ; and sent off detachments on all hands, to hunt down the fugitives, and lay waste the country with fire and sword.
Page 110 - His happy constitution (even when he had, with great pains, half demolished it) made him forget everything when he was before a venison pasty, or over a flask of champagne; and I am persuaded he has known more happy moments than any prince upon earth.
Page 75 - I depended upon him, I trusted him, I gave up my two dear unprovided children into his hands ; but he has no compassion, and suffers them and their poor dying mother to beg their bread at his door, and to crave, as if it were an alms, what he is bound under hand and seal, besides the most sacred promises, to supply them with : himself, at the same time, living in a profusion of plenty. It is too much for me.
Page 47 - Hill; it stood on a vast rock of white marble, at the foot of which the river ran a vast depth down, and not to be descended on that side; the little waves still dashing and washing the foot of this rock, made the softest murmurs and purlings in the world...
Page 193 - Talking of widows — pray, Eliza, if ever you are such, do not think of giving yourself to some wealthy Nabob, because I design to marry you myself. My wife cannot live long, and I know not the woman I should like so well for her substitute as yourself.
Page 180 - It having been observed that there was little hospitality in London ; JOHNSON. " Nay, sir, any man who has a name, or who has the power of pleasing, will be very generally invited in London. The man, Sterne, I have been told, has had engagements for three months." GOLDSMITH.
Page 191 - You have heard, continued he, of an old Lord Bathurst, of whom your Popes and Swifts have sung and spoken so much: I have lived my life with geniuses of that cast ; but have survived them ; and, despairing ever to find their equals, it is some years since I have...
Page 133 - Why, Sir, if you were to read Richardson for the story, your impatience would be so much fretted that you would hang yourself. But you must read him for the sentiment, and consider the story as only giving occasion to the sentiment.

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