Novels, Stories, Sketches and Poems, Volume 15

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Scribner, 1909
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Page 238 - I have just now mentioned ? and without staying for my answer told me, that he was afraid of being insulted with Latin and Greek at his own table ; for which reason he desired a particular friend of his at the University to find him out a Clergyman rather of plain sense than much learning, of a good aspect, a clear voice, a sociable temper, and, if possible, a man that understood a little of backgammon. My friend...
Page 14 - Wolffert's first experience very nearly justified this conviction. The fact that a Jew had come and taken one of the old apartments spread through the college with amazing rapidity and created a sensation. Not that there had not been Jews there before, for there had been a number there at one time or another. But they were members of families of distinction, who had been known for generations as bearing their part in all the appointments of life, and had consorted with other folk on an absolute equality;...
Page 10 - Why should he be able to make easily a demonstration at the blackboard that the cleverest of us only bungled through ? One day, however, we learned that the Jew had a room-mate. Bets were freely taken that he would not stick, but he stuck — for it was John Marvel. Not that any of us knew what John Marvel was ; for even I, who, except Wolffert, came to know him best, did not divine until many years later what a nugget of unwrought gold that homely, shy, awkward John Marvel was! It appeared that...
Page 189 - MISS LEIGH SEEKS WORK She drove first to Dr. Capon's church and, going around, walked in at the side door near the east end, where the robing rooms and the rector's study were. She remembered to have seen on a door somewhere there a sign on which was painted in gilded letters the fact that the rector's office hours were from 12 to 1 on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays, and this was Thursday.
Page 184 - No, of course not. Where did you get such an idea?" He lighted his cigar with a look of relief, put it in his mouth, and sat back in his chair. "Don't let your Aunt Sophia go and make a fool of you. She is a very good business woman, but you know she is not exactly — Solomon, and she is stark mad about titles. When you many, marry a man.
Page 307 - Man-el's friends, or (after a pause) Miss Leigh's friends may command me. I am only too glad to be able to serve them. It's the only way I can help." "That's what I told him," said my friend, whose name I heard for the first time. " I told him you weren't one of these Jew doctors that appraise a man as soon as he puts his nose in the door and skin him clean.
Page 326 - one of the big men up here ПОЛУ" and he had had him turned out because he did not "belong to the union." He was willing to join the union now, but " Wringman had had him turned down." Then he had gotten a place as a driver. But he had been ill and had lost his place, and since then he had not been able to get work, "though the preacher had tried to help him." He did not seem to complain of this loss of his place. " The wagon had to run," he said, but he and his wife, too, had been ill, and the...
Page 71 - I occasionally kept or tried to keep in a deceptive-looking desk which I used as a sideboard for myself and friends. He usually wore an old suit of mine, in which he looked surprisingly well, but on occasions he wore a long-tailed coat, a red necktie and a large soft, light hat which, cocked on the side of his head, gave him the air of an Indian potentate. I think he considered himself in some sort a partner. He always referred to me and my business as "us" and "our" business, and, on some one's...
Page 133 - What did he find out?" inquired Miss Leigh, "and how did he do it?" " Why, he just ran him down," explained the girl easily, "just as he does anybody he wants to know about — put a man on him, you know." "Oh! I see." Miss Leigh froze up a little; but the other girl did not notice it. "Only this one was somebody on the other side, of course", and he found out that he's all right. He's a real count. He's the third son of Count Puchkin, who was — let me see — a counsellor of his emperor, the Emperor...
Page 164 - But Wolffert was certain of the result and pointed out the work of his friend John Marvel as a proof of his theory. While, at first, the broad-shouldered young clergyman fled from her presence with a precipitation which was laughable, it was not long before he appeared to have steeled himself sufficiently against her shafts of good-natured persiflage to be able to tolerate her presence, and before a great while had passed, her friends began to tease her on the fact that wherever she went Mr. Marvel...

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