Nuanua: Pacific Writing in English Since 1980

Front Cover
Albert Wendt
University of Hawaii Press, 1995 - Literary Criticism - 405 pages
This important anthology of contemporary Pacific writing in English is a successor to Lali, first published in 1980 and widely read and admired. Nuanua, like Lali, edited by distinguished Samoan writer Albert Wendt, shows the growing strength and confidence of Pacific writing in fiction and poetry since 1980. It includes work from new and well-established writers from nine Pacific communities: Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Vanuatu, Niue, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Samoa. The legacy of colonialism and the problems of development and political change are among the themes explored.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Tom Davis
27
Johnny Frisbie Hebenstreit Beachcombers 81
43
Kauraka Kauraka
49
Makiuti Tongia Station 111
57
Tell MeWhere theTrain Goes
113
Mona Matepi Webb
120
Pio Manoa Beia and loane
139
NIUE Nuigo Market
249
Albert Wendt
302
SOLOMON ISLANDS
330
An Unexpected Gift 556
336
John Saunana
350
TONGA
362
Epeli Hauofa
368
Konai HeluThaman
383
VANUATU
390

Nora Vagi Brash Litia Alaelua
259
John Kasaipwalova Epi Enari Fuaau
267
Ignatius Kilage Sano Malifa
273
Steven Thomas Lyadale Papeete by Night
279
Makerita Vaai
295
Contributors 597
397
Vincent Warakai Birdcall I 255
402
Glossarv
405
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1995)

The best-known writer from the South Pacific, Albert Wendt was born into a Samoan family. He left Samoa in 1952 to attend a high school in New Zealand as a scholarship student. He later received an M.A. in history from Victoria University in Wellington. After teaching at universities in Fiji and Samoa, Wendt now holds a professorship of Pacific studies at Auckland University. Wendt is the product of two cultures---the Samoan of his childhood and the European of his education. This inevitable clash of values figures in Wendt's first novel, Sons for the Return Home (1973), which recounts a doomed love affair between a Samoan man and a woman of European descent. The narrative also reveals how the young man feels torn between two cultural poles. Wendt's next novel, Pouliuli (1976), takes Samoan life as its subject. Sometimes called a South Pacific version of King Lear, the story follows the trials of an aged chief who tests those around him. Wendt's novel receiving the most attention is Leaves of the Banyan Tree (1979), a saga of Samoan family life that moves through several decades until the post-independence period. Flying-Fox in a Freedom Tree and The Birth and Death of the Miracle Man, Wendt's two collections of short stories, take up aspects of Samoan life---its traditions, its clashes with European culture, and its disintegration. In these stories Wendt rewrites old myths to show how tradition can instruct the present. Wendt has also published poetry, Inside Us the Dead (1976) and Shaman of Visions (1984), which incorporates the tropical beauty of Samoa and its oral traditions. He also has compiled several anthologies, including collections of poetry from Fiji, Western Samoa, the New Hebrides, and the Solomons.

Bibliographic information