Numbers from Nowhere: The American Indian Contact Population Debate

Front Cover
University of Oklahoma Press, 1998 - Social Science - 532 pages
0 Reviews
In the past forty years an entirely new paradigm has developed regarding the contact population of the New World. Proponents of this new theory argue that the American Indian population in 1492 was ten, even twenty, times greater than previous estimates. In Numbers from Nowhere David Henige argues that the data on which these high counts are based are meager and often demonstrably wrong. Interpreting the archaeological as well as the historical evidence, Henige concludes that the task of assigning meaningful numbers for the American Indian contact population is an impossible one.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Do Numbers Lie?
3
The Historical Career of One Number
17
Higher Numbers Higher Ground
23
Damning the Torpedoes
29
Giving Disease a Bad Name
66
Rashomon the Chronicler
88
Antipodean Antics
113
Evading History through Language
133
Colonial Cloning
192
The Jury Will Disregard
205
By Wonder Inflamed
243
Epidemic Hyperbole
255
Careful Errors
264
Numbering the ImaginaryImagining Numbers
276
How Many Wrongs Make a Right?
293
Numbers Do Lie
303

Rescuing History from the Sources
146
Fragments in Search of Predispositions
154
Contact Does Not Equal Contagion
167
Surplus to Requirements
184
Notes
317
Abbreviations
425
Index
518
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

David Henige is African Studies and Near East Bibliographer in the Memorial Library, University of Wisconsin Madison. He is the author of In Search of Columbus: The Sources for the First Voyage.

Bibliographic information