Numerology: Or, What Pythagoras Wrought

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Cambridge University Press, 1997 - Mathematics - 324 pages
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Numerology is the delusion that numbers have power over events. It is a descendent of number mysticism, the belief the contemplation of numbers can give mystical and non-rational insights into life, the universe and everything. 2500 years ago, Pythagoras originated number mysticism, crediting certain numbers with characteristics, through numerology, is a more recent invention that allots numbers, hence characteristics, to individuals. Underwood Dudley outlines here the history of number mysticism and numerology and gives many examples, including biorhythyms, Bible-numberists, pyramidologists and a plethora of others. His message is that numbers do indeed have power, but over minds not events. This is the only book that exposes this particular human folly, and requires no mathematical background beyond knowledge of numbers.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Pythagoras
2
Neopythagoreanism
17
The Pythagoreans Abroad
31
Alphabets for Gematria
45
The Beast
55
Beastly Curiosities
67
The Beast is Coming
75
Mrs L Dow Balliett
170
Numerology Books
185
What Numerologists Sell
191
Listen for Your Number
199
The Power of the Pyramid
205
Inside the Pyramid
221
The Pyramid Stonehenge the Malaysian Lottery and the Washington Monument
229
Pyramidiocy
241

The Law of Small Numbers
81
Comes the Revolution
89
The Law of Round Numbers
95
Biblical Sevens
103
Thirleens and Squares
113
The Triangles of Genesis
123
Paragrams
129
Shakespeares Numbers
137
Rithmomachy
147
Number Forms
159
Are You Gridding?
253
Enneagrams
264
All that Glistens
271
Numbers Numbers Every where
281
Biorhythms
287
Riding the Wave
295
Conclusion
311
Index
313
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Underwood Dudley was born in New York City in 1937. He has bachelor's and master's degrees from the Carnegie Institute of Technology and received the Ph.D. degree (number theory) from the University of Michigan in 1965. He taught at the Ohio State University and at DePauw University, from which he retired in 2004. He is the author of three books on mathematical oddities, The Trisectors, Mathematical Cranks, and Numerology, an elementary number theory text, and is the editor of two collections of mathematical pieces. He has edited the College Mathematics Journal, the Pi Mu Epsilon Journal, and two of the Mathematical Association of America's book series. He has served as the MAA's Polya lecturer and has received its Distinguished Service Award. He is a member of the MAA, the American Mathematical Society, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

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