Obasan

Front Cover
Anchor Books, 1982 - Fiction - 300 pages
8 Reviews
Based on the author's own experiences, this award-winning novel was the first to tell the story of the evacuation, relocation, and dispersal of Canadian citizens of Japanese ancestry during the Second World War. "This quiet novel burns in your hand." -- "Washington Post."
 

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Silent Suffering Finds Closure

User Review  - Kelliegirl - Borders

Obasan was written by Joy Kogawa. It's the first part of a two-book sequel - the next book being Itsuka. But Obasan was told through the main character, Naomi Nakane. After her uncle died, she visited ... Read full review

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Unfortunate that this is not a popular read and limited to only a school book now a days. The book has a very powerful story of the Japanese internment showing the events from the perspective of a young child and showing how the events affected her 30 years after. Very entertaining but may seem a bit slow but I felt that the slow pace was necessary to show the main characters progress towards delving into her memories 

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Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
6
Section 3
20
Section 4
27
Section 5
37
Section 6
52
Section 7
57
Section 8
65
Section 21
189
Section 22
198
Section 23
205
Section 24
214
Section 25
217
Section 26
227
Section 27
231
Section 28
239

Section 9
69
Section 10
78
Section 11
85
Section 12
92
Section 13
131
Section 14
138
Section 15
146
Section 16
150
Section 17
156
Section 18
163
Section 19
169
Section 20
178
Section 29
244
Section 30
250
Section 31
257
Section 32
265
Section 33
272
Section 34
275
Section 35
280
Section 36
289
Section 37
293
Section 38
297
Section 39
302
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Joy Kogawa was born in Vancouver in 1935 to Japanese-Canadian parents. During WWII, Joy and her family were forced to move to Slocan, British Columbia, an injustice Kogawa addresses in her award-winning novel, Obasan. Kogawa has worked to educate Canadians about the history of Japanese Canadians and she was active in the fight for official governmental redress.

In 1986, Kogawa was made a Member of the Order of Canada and in 2010, the Japanese government honored her with the Order of the Rising Sun "for her contribution to the understanding and preservation of Japanese Canadian history.

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