Object-Oriented Metamethods

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 19, 1997 - Computers - 158 pages
Object technology is maturing rapidly. One sign of that is the formality of the discussions that occur all around the world: at conferences, in newsgroups, in industry developer groups and in academe. One face of formality is metamodelling: seeking the model of the model that gives the rules by which the model itself is constructed. In OT terms, it means seeking the underpinning rules in a methodology in which, for instance, it is suggested we depict an aggregate structure using one particular notation. The questions that need answering are the semantics of that relation ship and the constraints; i. e. , when and how it is allowable and what values/constructs are not admissible. In the past, these rules and constraints have been merely written down in textbooks and methodology manuals. Unfortunately, despite the plethora of au thoring and word processing programs available, this leads to in consistencies when cross-checks are not assiduously undertaken. There are few explict signs of metamodels in the published OOAD texts. In this book, we describe how we found those metamodels implicitly written into the methods. We formalized each of these in exactly the same way, using the same metalevel concepts and metarelationships. This book describes the fruits of those metamodelling labours, which we undertook as objectively as possible in 1995. In 1996 we then worked with the individual methodologists to ensure that we had not misinterpreted any par ticular metamodels.
 

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Contents

The Methodology Explosion
3
What Does Industry Require?
5
21 Choosing a methodology
7
Standardized Methodologies?
9
31 Standardization or interoperability?
11
32 Metamodelling
12
33 COMMA the proposal
15
Project Description and Results
21
56 MartinOdell
59
57 BON
66
58 Fusion
70
510 Coad
83
511 Shlaer and Mellor
86
512 Firesmith
99
513 OBA
112
The COMMA core metamodels
119

Description of the COMMA Project
23
42 Selected methodologies a brief synoptic description
26
43 The metamodelling notation and semantics
29
The Derived Metamodels
33
52 OMT
39
53 RDD
44
54 MOSES
49
55 SOMA
54
An Embryonic Core
121
62 The static model for relationships
130
63 The metamodel for state transitions
134
Conclusions and Recommendations
143
References
145
Index
155
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