Observations on the Mortmain Laws, Act of Supremacy, &c., with Reference to Bills Now Before Parliament, Or, Popery Opposed to National Independence, and Social Happiness

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Seeley, Burnside, and Seeley, 1846 - Catholic emancipation - 16 pages
 

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Page 4 - England as in Ireland, have been settled and established by law ; Be it therefore enacted, That if any person after the commencement of this Act other than the person thereunto authorized by law, shall assume or use the name, style, or title of Archbishop of any province, Bishop of any bishopric, or Dean of any deanery, in England or Ireland, he shall for every such offence forfeit and pay the sum of One hundred pounds.
Page 5 - Commencement of this Act, resort to or be present at any Place or Public Meeting for Religious Worship in England or in Ireland, other than that of the United Church of England and Ireland, or in Scotland, other than that of the Church of Scotland, as...
Page 5 - ... this act, exercise any of the rites or ceremonies of the Roman catholic religion, or wear the habits of his order, save within the usual places of worship of the Roman catholic religion, or in private houses, such ecclesiastic or other person, shall being thereof convicted by due '
Page 5 - Rome, bound by monastic or religious vows, and resident within the kingdom, and the coming and returning of Jesuits, or members of any such religious orders, communities, or societies into this realm, and the registration of Jesuits or members of any such orders, communities, or societies, and the admittance of persons to become Jesuits or regular ecclesiastics, or brothers or members of any such religious orders, communities, or societies, and the administering or taking of any oaths, vows, or engagements,...
Page 5 - That if any Roman Catholic Ecclesiastic, or any Member of any of the Orders, Communities, or Societies hereinafter mentioned, shall, after the Commencement of this Act, exercise any of the Rites or Ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Religion, or wear the Habits of his Order, save within the usual Places of Worship of the Roman Catholic Religion, or in private Houses, such Ecclesiastic or other Person shall, being thereof convicted by due Course of Law, forfeit for every such Offence the Sum of Fifty...
Page 5 - Place or Public Meeting for Religious Worship in England or in Ireland, other than that of the United Church of England and Ireland, or in Scotland, other than that of the Church of Scotland, as by Law established, in the Robe, Gown, or other peculiar Habit of his Office, or attend with the Ensign or Insignia, or any Part thereof, of or belonging to such his Office...
Page 6 - And Whereas Jesuits, and Members of other Religious Orders . . . of the Church of Rome, bound by Monastic or Religious Vows are resident within the United Kingdom ; and it is expedient to make Provision for the gradual Suppression and final Prohibition of the same therein.
Page 5 - Act as relates to the gradual suppression and final prohibition of Jesuits and members of other religious orders, communities or societies of the Church of Rome...
Page 5 - ... punishments attending the violation of the laws, and the peace and security of our dominions may be endangered. Given at our Court, at Buckingham Palace, this 15th of June, in the year of our Lord, 1852, and in the 15th year of our reign.
Page 11 - ... persons are persuaded that by leaving large bequests for charitable purposes, or for the purpose of having so many masses said for the repose of their souls, they can wash out the stains of sin, or escape a certain period of the pains of purgatory, there would be great danger of unjust disherison. The danger of this is of course much less in our own Church, which teaches no such doctrine, but merely instructs the clergyman, when visiting a dying man, to exhort him to settle his worldly affairs,...

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