Observations on the design for the Theatre royal, Drury lane, as executed in 1812: accompanied by plans, elevation, & sections, of the same

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Page 24 - Stage-opening, and, with it, the magnitude and 23 expense of the Scenery, must remain in force ; and so long as our Theatres shall be maintained by the money paid at the doors, it will be impossible to reduce the size of those Theatres below the scale of their necessary expenses.
Page 12 - ... be quite lost if the box be hung with tapestry; whereas they are reflected, full, sonorous, and agreeable to the ear, where the boxes are only boarded, which is an obvious proof, and confirmed by experience, that the best lining for the interior part of a theatre is wood.
Page 7 - aware of the existence of a very popular notion, that our Theatres ought to be very small...
Page 40 - ... centre flights being exactly double the width of the side flights ; so that the conflux of persons from the side flights never can choke or obstruct the centre flights ; and these staircases are capable of containing, upon their own steps and landings, a much greater number of persons than the whole of the boxes can contain ; consequently, the ingress and egress to and from the boxes never can be obstructed for want of room upon the staircases. The whole of the boxes are capable of containing...
Page 18 - ... 14 in the Basement of the Theatre, immediately under the Dress Boxes. I confined the distance from the front of the Stage to the back wall of the Boxes, facing the Stage, to 53 feet 9 inches .... 38 feet 6 inches laterally. I have already stated, that the extreme distance from the front line of the Stage to the back wall of the Boxes, facing the Stage, according to my plan, is 53 feet 9 inches; in the late Theatre in Drury Lane it was 74 feet, or 20 feet 3 inches more than at present; in the...
Page 10 - Lane, differ from those in Oulton's account, and the architect's comparison of the dimensions of the new theater with those of older theaters is highly informative: Drury-lane Theatre, consisting of three-fourths of a circle, with a Proscenium limiting the Stage-opening to 33 feet, contains, in four different heights, 80 Boxes, holding 1098 persons; with four Boxes — of larger size than the rest — next to the Stage, on each side of the Theatre, capable of containing 188 Spectators in addition...
Page 20 - ... feet 9 inches; in the late Theatre in Drury Lane it was 74 feet, or 20 feet 3 inches more than at present; in the Old Theatre in Covent Garden (I mean as it was built about the year 1730), the distance between the front of the Stage, and the back wall of the front Boxes, was 54 feet 6 inches, or 1 foot 3 inches more than in my design. In the Old Opera House, built by Sir John Vanburgh, in the Haymarket, it was 66 feet, or 12 feet 3 inches more than in my design. • • •••••• In...
Page 40 - ... being worked so readily as the business requires. The manager's room, actresses' dressing-rooms, and various other apartments, are on the north side of the stage ; and on the south are the two green-rooms, the * " All the doorways throughout these (viz. the auditory) parts of the house are from five to six feet wide, according to circumstances ; the steps and landings of the staircases to the galleries are five feet, and those to the boxes six. In the principal stone staircases, leading to the...
Page 20 - ... wall of the Boxes, facing the Stage, to 53 Feet 9 inches ... 38 feet 6 inches laterally. — I have already stated, that the extreme distance from the front line of the Stage to the back wall of the Boxes, facing the Stage, according to my Plan, is 53 feet 9 inches; in the late Theatre in Drury Lane it was 74 feet, or 20 feet 3 inches more than at present; in the Old Theatre in Covent Garden (I mean as it was built about the year 1730), the distance between the front of the Stage, and the back...

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