Observer: A Collection of Moral, Literary and Familiar Essays, Volume 4

Front Cover
Bachariah Jackson, 1791 - Conduct of life
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 199 - ... twas suffocating silent woe. Let us drop the curtain over this melancholy pause in our narration, and attend upon the mournful widower now landing upon English ground, and conveyed by his humane and generous preserver to the house of a noble earl, the father of our amiable captain, and a man by his virtues still more conspicuous than by his rank. Here amidst the gentle solicitudes of a benevolent family, in one of the most enchanting spots on earth, in a climate...
Page 101 - His scenes exhibit not much of humour, imagery, or passion : his personages are a kind of intellectual gladiators ; every sentence is to ward or strike ; the contest of smartness is never intermitted ; his wit is a meteor playing to and fro with alternate coruscations.
Page 146 - As he lived in constant serenity of mind, so he died without pain of body ; for having called together a number of his friends to the reading of a play, which he had newly finished, and sitting, as was the custom in that serene climate, under the open canopy of Heaven, an unforeseen fall of rain broke up the company...
Page 36 - ... every body to be warmed by the contemplation of her figure or the reflection of her countenance ; at the...
Page 190 - He found every thing in confusion, a deck covered with the slain, and the whole crew in consternation at an event they were in no degree prepared for, not having received any intimation of a war. He found the officers in general, and the passengers without exception, under the most horrid impressions of the English, and expecting to be plundered, and perhaps butchered without mercy.
Page 196 - Spaniard's hand in his, and seating him on a couch beside him, ordered the centinel to keep the cabin private, and delivered himself as follows : ' Senor Don Manuel, I must now impart to you an anxiety which I labour under on your account ; I have strong reason to suspect you have enemies in your own country, who are upon the watch to arrest you on your landing: when I have told you this, I expect you will repose such trust in my honour, and the sincerity of my regard for you, as not to demand a...
Page 261 - Every hope being extinguished by the receipt of" this letter, the disconsolate Rachel became henceforth one of the most miserable of human beings : after venting a torrent of rage against her brother...
Page 157 - ... abovementioned most eloquently displays in his parallel between Christ and that Impostor ; the Deist will perhaps be much interested to support his favourite philosopher, and will care little for the prophet : the .modern Platonist, who is ingenious to erect a new system of natural religion out of the ruins of heathen idolatry, may be zealous to defend the founder of his faith, and his anger I must submit to incur ; but it is not quite so easy to bear the reproof of friends, from whom I have...
Page 31 - ... are a kind of balancing powers, which feem indeed to hold a neutrality in moral affairs, but, holding it with arms in their hands, cannot be fuppofed to remain impartial fpectators of the fray, and therefore muft be either with us, or againft us.
Page 100 - As for that diftinguifhing chara&eriftic, which the ingenious efTayift terms very properly the harmony of its cadence ; that I take to be incommunicable and immediately dependant upon the ear of him who. models it. This harmony of cadence is fo...

Bibliographic information