Occupational Ergonomics: Engineering and Administrative Controls

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Waldemar Karwowski, William S. Marras
CRC Press, Mar 26, 2003 - Technology & Engineering - 680 pages
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Occupational Ergonomics: Engineering and Administrative Controls focuses on prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders with an emphasis on engineering and administrative controls. Section I provides knowledge about risk factors for upper and lower extremities at work, while Section II concentrates on risk factors for work-related low back disorders. Section III discusses fundamentals of surveillance of musculoskeletal disorders, requirements for surveillance database systems, OSHA Record keeping system, and surveillance methods based on the assessment of body discomfort. Section IV focuses on medical management of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, including programs for post-injury management, testing of physical ability for employment decisions, assessment of worker strength and other functional capacities, and applications of ergonomics knowledge in rehabilitation.
 

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Contents

III
1-1
IV
2-1
V
3-1
VI
4-1
VII
5-1
VIII
6-1
IX
7-1
X
8-1
XXIV
21-1
XXV
22-1
XXVI
22-37
XXVII
22-39
XXVIII
23-1
XXIX
24-1
XXX
25-1
XXXI
26-1

XI
9-1
XII
9-17
XIII
10-1
XIV
11-1
XV
12-1
XVI
13-1
XVII
14-1
XVIII
15-1
XIX
16-1
XX
17-1
XXI
18-1
XXII
19-1
XXIII
20-1
XXXII
26-15
XXXIII
27-1
XXXIV
28-1
XXXV
29-1
XXXVI
30-1
XXXVII
31-1
XXXVIII
32-1
XXXIX
33-1
XL
34-1
XLI
35-1
XLII
36-1
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About the author (2003)

Karwowski, University of Louisville, Kentucky.

William S. Marras PhD, is a Professor in the College of Engineering and the College of Medicine at The Ohio State University, a certified professional ergonomist, and a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the International Ergonomics Society, and the Ergonomics Society. He holds two patents for devices for monitoring motion of the spine. He is an ergonomic consultant for the U.S. Department of Labor, Ford Motor Company, RCA, Honda, and other corporations and associations. He has had over 180 articles published in various medical and ergonomic journals and has coauthored several books on occupational ergonomics. He is currently the chair of the Human Factors Committee within the National Academy of Sciences.

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