Odyssey of Gold

Front Cover
Associated University Presses, 1995 - Business & Economics - 239 pages
Aaron A. Gold once described his Oxford First Corporation as a company "started by nobody, with nothing."
Yet from this unpromising beginning, he built a small-loan business in North Philadelphia into a $100 million company and gained a national reputation for sagacity in consumer finance.
In Odyssey of Gold, completed shortly before his death in 1993, Gold explains how he did it. His story makes wonderful reading both as a how-to-succeed business book and as one man's often hilarious encounters with the good, the bad, and the weird in modern life.
 

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Contents

The Beginning
17
I Meet Herman the Hook
21
Cat Houses I Have Known
28
Sgt Gold Sells Oranges
34
The Founding of Oxford
37
Finding a Market
42
Finding Lenders
48
Of Scoundrels and Saints
54
The Hope Chest Caper and Other Unusual Acquisitions
135
Why I Left Oxford
142
Oxfords Disastrous Plunge into Real Estate
147
Back to Work at Oxford
152
My Foes and My Friends
158
Hilton Headaches
163
Hard Work Takes Its Toll
173
Fun and Games in Florida
178

Financing Coal Sales Weight Salons and a Glass Boat
61
Oxford Expands
65
The Man in the Gray Homburg
70
Times When I Wasnt So Smart
79
Betrayal
86
The Perils of Lending to Poor People
94
Hail to My Professor
100
The Story Behind the Story of a Merger
106
Oxford Goes Public and I Get Rich
111
Thank God for the ParachuteRiggers Knot
117
Henry Morgan My Wise Counselor
126
Jack Plover Teaches Me a Lesson
183
My Junior Wolf Approach in Hawaii
189
A Southern Gentleman Wins a Duel of Wordsand Oxford Wins a Sale
194
I Send Out for Champagne and Get Gloriously Plastered
200
Lady Bankers and a Lady Bartender
207
The Rise and Fall of Bubba
212
A Deal with Banc One Falls Through
218
Oxford is Acquired by Cawsl Corporation
224
I Do Not Live by Bread Alone
235
Copyright

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Page 9 - Emerson's dictum that an institution is the lengthened shadow of one man would surely apply to Aaron Gold and the Oxford First Corporation.

About the author (1995)

Peter Husted Binzen was born in Montclair, New Jersey on September 24, 1922. During World War II, he served with the Army's 10th Mountain Division in Italy. He received a bachelor's degree in political science from Yale University in 1947. After college, he sold subscriptions at a New Jersey weekly, freelanced, and worked briefly for United Press, before joining The Evening and Sunday Bulletin in 1951. He worked there, specializing in education and urban affairs, until the newspaper closed in 1982. He then wrote a business column for The Philadelphia Inquirer until he retired in 2003. His first book, Whitetown, USA, was published in 1970. He also wrote The Wreck of the Penn Central and The Cop Who Would Be King: The Honorable Frank Rizzo with Bulletin colleague Joseph R. Daughen and Richardson Dilworth: Last of the Bare-Knuckled Aristocrats with his son Jonathan P. Binzen. He died from complications of a stroke on November 16, 2016 at the age of 94.

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