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Page 260 - Disparts a dew-lipp'd rose. Above his head, Four lily stalks did their white honours wed To make a coronal ; and round him grew All tendrils green, of every bloom and hue, Together...
Page 269 - THOU cheerful bee ! come, freely come, And travel round my woodbine bower ; Delight me with thy wandering hum, And rouse me from my musing hour ; Oh ! try no more yon tedious fields, Come taste the sweets my garden yields ; The treasure of each blooming mine, The bud, the blossom — all are thine.
Page 272 - A bee amongst the flowers in spring, is one of the most cheerful objects that can be looked upon. Its life appears to be all enjoyment : so busy and so pleased...
Page 286 - ... cottagers in the most improved management. It would be an excellent plan to attach a stall of bees to the south wall of a gardener's cottage or lodge, with a glass side towards the interior, so that the operations of the bees might be watched from within. The custom of placing them within an arched recess in the wall of the house was one of old Rome, and is still observed in some countries.
Page 86 - ... by admixture with the liquids which are secreted in the mouth and crop of the insect — so that the honey we extract from the hive may not be exactly in the same chemical condition as when it was sucked up from the flowers by the laborious bee. When liquid honey is allowed to stand for a length of time, it gradually thickens and consolidates. By pressure in a linen bag, it may then be separated into a white solid sugar, consisting of minute crystals, which remain in the bag, and a thick semifluid...
Page 109 - ... silkworms, and endeavour to raise a large breed under violet glass. * The effects of the sun's rays, when filtered through differently coloured glass, upon the development of infusorial life, has recently occupied Mr. Samuelson. He fitted up a box containing three compartments, covered by a pane of blue, red, and yellow glass respectively, and found that under the blue and red glass infusoria were rapidly developed, whilst under the yellow hardly any signs of life were visible. He then transferred...
Page 72 - ... have already been written; but on account of their utility to man, bees have long since been placed upon the first rank among domesticated animals. An ancient historian, Niebuhr, states that he met between Cairo and Damietta a convoy of 4000 hives, which were being transported from a region where the season for flowers had passed, to one where the summer was later. Our domestic hive-bee (Apis mellifica, Fig. 6) appears to be a native of Greece ;* from whence it was subsequently introduced into...
Page 279 - the males are spared; and, while a savage massacre rages in other hives, they here find an asylum. They are tolerated and fed, and many are seen even in the middle of January." The cause of this may perhaps be looked for in the additional heat which they would generate in winter ; or perhaps they may be preserved for the purpose of pairing with a new queen. On the Impregnation of the Queen-Bee. — In looking into a hive in spring or summer, the Queen will be seen laying...
Page 311 - And plant (the wind's impetuous rage to stop) Wild olive trees, or palms, before the busy shop ; That when the youthful prince, with proud alarm, Calls out th' venturous colony to swarm — When first their way through yielding air they wing, New to the pleasures of their native spring — The banks of brooks may make a cold retreat For the raw soldiers from the scalding heat...
Page 39 - He was engaged likewise, in conjunction with Mr John Martyn, FRS and professor of botany at Cambridge, in preparing for the press a translation and abridgment of the " Philosophical History and Memoirs of the Royal Academy of Sciences at Paris...

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