Of the Law of Nature and Nations: Eight Books

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1729 - Law - 878 pages
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Pufendorf, Samuel von. [Barbeyrac, Jean]. Of the Law of Nature and Nations. Eight Books. Written in Latin by the Baron Puffendorf. Done Into English by Basil Kennet. Carefully Corrected, with Two Tables. To Which Are Added All the Large Notes of Mr. Barbeyrac, Translated From the Best Edition; Together with Large Tables to the Whole. The Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected. To Which is Now Prefixed Mr. Barbeyrac's Prefatory Discourse, Containing an Historical and Critical Account of the Science of Morality, and the Progress It has Made in the World, From the Earliest Times Down to the Publication of This Work. Done Into English by Mr. Carew. London: Printed for J. Walthoe, R. Wilkin, [et. al.], 1729. [xxviii] 88, 878, [22] pp. Reprint available July 2004 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-394-4. Cloth. $195. * Reprint of the fourth English edition of De Jure Naturae et Gentium. In 1662 Samuel Pufendorf [1632-1694] was appointed to the first modern professorship in natural law (at the University of Heidelberg). In 1670 he became professor of natural law at the University of Lund in Sweden. First published in 1672, this is his principal work and a landmark in the history of natural and international law. It proposed a thorough system of private, public, and international law based on natural law. Beginning with a consideration of fundamental legal ideas and their various divisions, Pufendorf proceeded to a discussion of the validity of customs, the doctrines of necessity and innate human reason. The work is significant in part because it developed principles introduced by Grotius and Hobbes. Unlike Hobbes, Pufendorf argued that peace, not war, was the state of nature, and he proposed that international law was not restricted to Christendom.
 

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Contents

LVI
297
LVII
301
LVIII
306
LIX
333
LX
356
LXI
361
LXII
378
LXIII
385

IX
X
ii
XI
xii
XII
xiii
XIII
xv
XIV
xvi
XV
xvii
XVI
xviii
XVIII
xix
XIX
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XX
xxii
XXI
xxiii
XXII
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XXIII
xxx
XXIV
xxxii
XXV
xxxiii
XXVI
xxxix
XXVII
xli
XXVIII
xliii
XXIX
xlviii
XXX
lii
XXXI
liv
XXXII
lvi
XXXIII
lix
XXXIV
1
XXXV
14
XXXVI
24
XXXVII
34
XXXVIII
44
XXXIX
58
XL
77
XLI
89
XLII
91
XLIII
96
XLIV
102
XLV
117
XLVI
153
XLVII
183
XLVIII
202
XLIX
213
L
224
LI
233
LII
252
LIII
259
LIV
266
LV
286
LXIV
397
LXV
405
LXVI
413
LXVII
418
LXVIII
426
LXIX
439
LXX
450
LXXI
459
LXXII
471
LXXIII
477
LXXIV
480
LXXV
489
LXXVI
498
LXXVII
502
LXXVIII
513
LXXIX
515
LXXX
518
LXXXI
526
LXXXII
534
LXXXIII
553
LXXXV
559
LXXXVI
598
LXXXVII
614
LXXXVIII
623
LXXXIX
635
XC
654
XCI
660
XCII
669
XCIII
687
XCIV
705
XCV
716
XCVI
732
XCVII
747
XCVIII
757
XCIX
762
CI
799
CII
823
CIII
833
CIV
849
CV
854
CVI
857
CVII
864
CVIII
868
CIX
875
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About the author (1729)

Born in Dorfchemnitz, Saxony, the son of a Lutheran pastor, Samuel Pufendorf was educated at Leipzig and Jena. At Jena he first read Grotius and Hobbes, and studied under Erhard Weigel. In 1658 he became a tutor in the household of the Swedish ambassador to Denmark; when war erupted between these two countries, he was imprisoned for eight months. It was during this time that Pufendorf wrote his first work in philosophy of law, the brief Universal Elements of Jurisprudence (1660). Subsequently he taught jurisprudence at the University of Heidelberg and the University of Lund (in Sweden); from 1688 onward he lived in Berlin as court historian to the Duke of Brandenburg. Pufendorf produced historical writings, such as his 1667 account of the Holy Roman Empire, as well as treatises on moral and legal philosophy. His greatest work was the On the Law of Nature and Nations (1672). Although Pufendorf is often described (accurately enough) as a natural rights theorist and also as the thinker who first introduced the ideas of Grotius and Hobbes into Germany, his true originality consisted in his view that a society's law and morality are a function of its culture considered as a determinate and living whole. He may thus be regarded as the inventor of the sociological approach to law. As a historian, he anticipated many of the views of nineteenth-century historicism.

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