Of the Nature of Things: In Six Books, Volume 2

Front Cover
G. Sawbridge, 1714
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 583 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 543 - Nor drum was heard, nor trumpet's angry sound; Nor swords were forged ; but void of care and crime. The soft creation slept away their time. The teeming earth, yet guiltless of the plough, And unprovoked, did fruitful stores allow : Content with food which nature freely bred, On wildings and on strawberries they fed; Cornels and bramble-berries gave the rest, And falling acorns furnished out a feast The flowers, unsown, in fields and meadows reigned ; And western winds immortal spring maintained.
Page 651 - On their eternal anvils here he found The brethren beating, and the blows go round; A load of pointless thunder now there lies Before their hands to ripen for the skies. These darts for angry Jove they daily cast...
Page 498 - Hither, as to their fountain, other stars Repairing, in their golden urns draw light...
Page 439 - Tunes her nocturnal note. Thus with the year /,» Seafons return ; but not to me returns Day, or the fweet approach of ev'n or morn, Or fight of vernal bloom, or fummer's rofe, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine : But cloud inftead, and ever-during dark 4£ " Surrounds me ! from the chearful ways of men Cut off...
Page 528 - Scylla, bathing in the sea that parts Calabria from the hoarse Trinacrian shore : Nor uglier follow the night-hag, when call'd In secret riding through the air she comes, Lured with the smell of infant blood, to dance With Lapland witches, while the labouring moon Eclipses at their charms.
Page 533 - As from his lair, the wild beast, where he wons In forest wild, in thicket, brake, or den ; Among the trees in pairs they rose, they...
Page 549 - Could thro' the ranks of ruin go, With storms above, and rocks below ! In vain did Nature's wise command Divide the waters from the land, If daring ships and men prophane Invade th' inviolable main ; Th' eternal fences over-leap, And pass at will the boundless deep.
Page 471 - Fell through the mighty void, and, in their fall, Were blindly gather'd in this goodly ball. The tender soil then, stiff'ning by degrees, Shut from the bounded earth the bounding seas. Then earth and ocean various forms disclose; And a new sun to the new world arose; And mists, condens'd to clouds, obscure the sky; And clouds, dissolv'd, the thirsty ground supply.
Page 471 - He sung the secret seeds of Nature's frame; How seas, and earth, and air, and active flame, Fell through the mighty void, and, in their fall, Were blindly gather'd in this goodly ball.

Bibliographic information