Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in Motion

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Oxford University Press, Sep 21, 2000 - Social Science - 264 pages
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The Ojibwe or Anishinaabe are a native American people of the northern Great Lakes region. 19th-century missionaries promoted the singing of evangelical hymns translated into the Ojibwe language as a tool for rooting out their "indianness," but the Ojibwe have ritualized the singing to make the hymns their own. In this book, McNally relates the history and current practice of Ojibwe hymn singing to explore the broader cultural processes that place ritual resources at the center of so many native struggles to negotiate the confines of colonialism.
 

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Contents

ETHNOGRAPHY
123
DOES HYMN SINGING WORK? Notes on the Logic of Ritual Practice
195
NOTES
207
GLOSSARY
229
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
231
INDEX
241
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