Old Soldiers Sometimes Lie

Front Cover
Macmillan, Oct 4, 2002 - Fiction - 432 pages
0 Reviews
What happened to Hirohito's gold?

More than five decades ago, MacArthur permitted General Tomayuki Yamashita, the famed Tiger of Malaya, to be executed for alleged war crimes against the Filipino people. Now, Dr. Tomiko Kobayashi, the general's intrepid granddaughter is determined to clear Yamashita's name, even if it means unraveling a web of deceit and corruption that may stretch back to the Emperor himself-and a secret pact between Hirohito and MacArthur.

Why was Yamashita executed when many other Japanese war criminals, the truly guilty, escaped scot-free? What became of the fabled "Golden Lily," a treasure trove of plundered Asian war booty, including a set of eleven solid-gold dragons weighing more than five thousand pounds? And what might still be hidden beneath a bloodstained hill on the Philippine Island of Negros?

With the help of a disillusioned ex-CIA operative, Tomi is dead-set on exposing the dirty truth behind American intelligence operations in postwar Japan. But, even fifty years later, there are still those who prefer that the past stay buried, even if it means silencing Tomi's voice forever . . . .

Old Soldiers Sometimes Lie is a work of fiction that exposes a scandal that corrupts Japanese and American politics even to today. A former counterintelligence agent, as well as an award-winning author of espionage thrillers, Richard Hoyt pulls together disparate threads of historical fact and rumor to weave a gripping tale of intrigue and conspiracy in high places.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Tomis Find
13
BOOK ONE Kodama Yoshio
25
BOOK TWO In Remembrance of Yamashita
97
BOOK THREE Chibas Choice
179
BOOK FOUR Ceremonies
335
Among the Sugamo Nineteen
413
List of Historical People Places and Things
417
Source Notes
427
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Richard Hoyt, a graduate of the University of Oregon, is a former fellow of the Washington Journalism Center and holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Hawaii. He served as U.S. army counterintelligence agent, wrote for daily newspapers in Honolulu, and was a stringer for Newsweek magazine. He taught journalism at the University of Maryland and at Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Or.

Hoyt is the author of the John Denson mysteries, the James Burlane thrillers and numerous other novels of adventure, espionage and suspense including two under the pseudonym of Nicholas van Pelt. In researching and writing in more than two dozen countries in Europe, Latin America, and Asia, he has ridden trains across the Soviet Union and riverboats down the Amazon. He now lives in the Philippines.

Bibliographic information