Oliver Cromwell: His Life, Times, Battlefields, and Contemporaries

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Hodder and Stoughton, 1884 - Great Britain - 428 pages
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Page 338 - Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content. I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound: every where and in all things I am instructed both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need.
Page 405 - Marvel, Harrington, Young Vane, and others who called Milton friend. These moralists could act and comprehend : They knew how genuine glory was put on ; Taught us how rightfully a nation shone In splendour : what strength was, that would not bend But in magnanimous meekness.
Page 228 - If your forces had been in a readiness to have fallen upon the back of Copperspath, it might have occasioned supplies to have come to us. But the only wise God knows what is best. All shall work for Good. Our spirits are comfortable, praised be the Lord — though our present condition be as it is. And indeed we have much hope in the Lord ; of whose mercy we have had large experience.
Page 294 - Your pretended fear lest Error should step in, is like the man who would keep all the wine out of the country lest men should be drunk. It will be found an unjust and unwise jealousy, to deprive a man of his natural liberty upon a supposition he may abuse it. When he doth abuse it, judge.
Page 241 - Dear Heart, press on ; let not thy ' Husband, let not anything cool thy affections after ' Christ. I hope he \thy husband] will be an occasion ' to inflame them. That which is best worthy of love in " thy Husband is that of the image of Christ he bears. " Look on that, and love it best, and all the rest for that.
Page 348 - They never fail who die In a great cause : the block may soak their gore ; Their heads may sodden in the sun ; their limbs Be strung to city gates and castle walls — But still their spirit walks abroad. Though years Elapse, and others share as dark a doom, They but augment the deep and sweeping thoughts Which overpower all others, and conduct The world at last to freedom.
Page 337 - I can say in the presence of God, in comparison with whom we are but like poor creeping ants upon the earth, I would have been glad to have lived under my woodside, to have kept a flock of sheep, rather than undertaken such a government as this.
Page 172 - The left wing, which I commanded, being our own horse, saving a few Scots in our rear, beat all the Prince's horse. God made them as stubble to our swords, we charged their regiments of foot with our horse, routed all we charged.
Page 203 - And at a shock have scattered the forest of his pikes. Fast, fast, the gallants ride, in some safe nook to hide Their coward heads, predestined to rot on Temple Bar: And he — he turns, he flies: — shame on those cruel eyes That bore to look on torture, and dare not look on war.
Page 363 - Then to advise how war may best upheld Move by her two main nerves, iron and gold, In all her equipage...

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