On Buddhism

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Feb 1, 2012 - Philosophy - 187 pages
0 Reviews
On Buddhism presents the first English-language translation of a series of lectures by Keiji Nishitani (1900–1990), a major Buddhist thinker and a key figure in the Kyoto School of Japanese philosophy. Originally delivered in the early 1970s, these lectures focus on the transformation of culture in the modern age and the subsequent decline in the importance of the family and religion. Nishitani’s concern is that modernity, with its individualism, materialism, and contractual ethics, is an insufficient basis for human relationships. With deep insight into both Buddhism and Christianity, he explores such issues as the nature of genuine human existence, the major role of conscience in our advance to authenticity, and the needed transformation of religion. Nishitani criticizes contemporary Buddhism for being too esoteric and asks that it “come down from Mt. Hiei” to reestablish itself as a vital source of worthy ideals and to point toward a way of remaining human even in a modern and postmodern world.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Part II On the Modernization of Buddhism
69
Part III On Conscience
109
GLOSSARY OF JAPANESE TERMS
157

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11 - of Japanese culture . . . [lies] in moving in the direction from subject to object [environment]. Ever thoroughly negating the self and becoming the thing itself; becoming the thing itself to see; becoming the thing itself to act. To empty the self and see things, for the self to be immersed in things, "no-mindedness" [in Zen Buddhism] or effortless acceptance of the grace of Amida
Page 20 - in Sources of Japanese Tradition, ed. Ryusaku Tsunoda, Wm. Theodore De Bary, and Donald Keene (New York: Columbia University Press, 1958), 2:
Page 20 - The essence of the Japanese spirit must be to become one in things and in events. It is to become one at that primal point in which there is neither self nor others.
Page 11 - To empty the self and see things, for the self to be immersed in things, "no-mindedness" [in Zen Buddhism] or effortless acceptance of the grace of Amida ... [in
Page 3 - in the present with one eye on the past and the other on the future,
Page 20 - a Japanese spirit which goes to the truth of things as an identity between actuality and reality, must be one which is based on this
Page 20 - goes to things,' that is not to say to go to matter. And although I say 'nature,' that is not to say objective or environmental nature. To go to things means starting from the subject, going beyond the subject, and going to the bottom of the subject. What I call the identity between actuality and reality
Page 6 - Pure Land is right here, and those who have eyes can see it around them. And Amida is not presiding over an ethereal paradise, but his Pure Land is this dirty earth itself.

About the author (2012)

Seisaku Yamamoto is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Kyoto University, Japan. Carter and Yamamoto are cotranslators of Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan, also published by SUNY Press.

Robert E. Carter is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Trent University, Canada. Robert E. Carter is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Trent University, Canada. Carter and Yamamoto are cotranslators of Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan, and Carter is the author of Encounter with Enlightenment: A Study of Japanese Ethics, both also published by SUNY Press.

Bibliographic information