On Meanings of Life: Their Nature and Origin

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SUNY Press, Aug 29, 2002 - Philosophy - 165 pages
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Addressing the question of what makes life meaningful, Jerome Eckstein explores the ways in which we can heighten or diminish the quality of our life experience. He focuses on two contrasting attitudes toward life experiences: “interested” (goal-oriented) and “intraested” (non-goal-oriented, i.e., something directed only at itself) and shows that both attitudes are important and necessary in order to make life meaningful. Philosophy, psychology, religion, myth, poetry, and music are all brought to bear on such specific life-meaning issues as work, play, love, art, neurosis, and happiness, and in a touching epilogue, Eckstein discusses his own life meanings in terms of metaphysical loneliness, laughter, and dignity.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Intraestedness and Meanings of Life
5
Excursus to Objectivity and Postmodernism
27
Suicide and Meanings of Life
47
Uncertainty Religion and Meanings of Life
75
Wholeness Primordial and Vicarial
107
Epilogue
131
Notes
139
Index
159
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About the author (2002)

Jerome Eckstein is Professor Emeritus of Judaic Studies at the University at Albany, State University of New York. He is the author of several titles, including Metaphysical Drift: Love and Judaism; The Deathday of Socrates: Living, Dying, and Immortality--The Theater of Ideas in Plato's Phaedo; and The Platonic Method: An Interpretation of the Dramatic-Philosophic Aspects of the Meno.

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