On Monosemy: A Study in Linguistic Semantics

Front Cover
SUNY Press, 1989 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 299 pages
0 Reviews
In this book, the author argues that words should be presumed initially to be monosemic: having a single, highly abstract meaning. Semantic research should first seek a unitary meaning, resorting to polysemy, homonymy or idiomaticity only when an extended attempt fails. Utilizing a large data base, this book shows that some supposed "lexical" semantic meaning is actually pragmatic or extralinguistic. Included are extensive treatments of the verbs bear, hit, kick and slap, the phrase take off, and the noun ice.

Ruhl studies linguistic research methods and theory, most directly relevant to the fields of semantics and pragmatics, and also to lexicography, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence. The hypothesis of monosemy implies significant changes of perspective and application for all fields which deal in lexical definition.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Verb Bear
25
Openness
64
The Verb Hit
96
Form and Meaning
128
Idioms and Particles
152
Definition
173
The Verbs Kick and Slap
207
Summary
234
Abbreviations in References
256
Other Abbreviations
262
References
269
Index
277
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1989)

Charles Ruhl is Associate Professor of English at Old Dominion University.

Bibliographic information