On Record: Files and Dossiers in American Life

Front Cover
Stanton Wheeler
Transaction Publishers, Dec 31, 2011 - Law - 421 pages
0 Reviews
On Record provides descriptive accounts of record-keeping in a variety of important organizations: schools and universities; consumer credit agencies, general business organizations, and life insurance companies; military and security agencies; the Census Bureau and the Social Security Administration; public welfare agencies, juvenile courts, and mental hospitals. It also examines the legal status of records. The authors address questions such as: Who determines what records are kept? Who has access to the records? To what extent do the records follow an individual? What are some of the dangers and pitfalls in record-keeping? Throughout the volume, the authors show a concern for an appropriate balance between the need for information about people and protection against undue invasions of privacy. The introduction of electronic databases since the original publication of this book makes the issues raised in this seminal collection even more timely.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Problems and Issues in RecordKeeping
3
The Scope of This Volume
4
Themes and Variations in RecordKeeping
10
The Policy Issues
24
Educational Institutions
27
RecordKeeping in Elementary and Secondary Schools
29
American Education and Educational Records
30
The History Development of RecordKeeping Procedures
34
Federal Data Collection
226
The Bureau of the Census
227
The Social Security Administration
242
Government StatisticsA Coordinated System
252
The Dossier in Military Organization
255
Forms of Military Dossiers
256
Disposition of Records
272
Issues and Implications
273

Current Practices
43
Trends and Future Prospects
57
Ethical Legal and Social Issues
61
The Dossier in Colleges and Universities
67
The Scope of RecordKeeping
68
The Primary Central Records
70
The Varieties of Location and Style
74
The Varieties of Confidence
80
Use of the Final Record After College
86
The Problem of Anticipation
89
InformationFlow Within the Professions Some Selective Comparisons of Law Medicine and Nursing
95
The Profession of Medicine
98
General Comparisons
116
General Comparisons Among Professions
127
Summary
138
Economic Institutions
141
The Dossier in Consumer Credit
143
How Credit Reporting Works
145
How Should Credit Reporting Work?
160
Future Trends and Issues
172
RecordKeeping and Corporate Employees
177
Sources of Information on Managers
180
Records on Nonmanagerial Personnel
181
Disclosure of Information on Employees
191
Implications and Issues in the Use of Corporate Dossiers
195
Conclusions
199
Personal Information in Insurance Files
203
Life Insurance Underwriting
205
Personal Information in Other Types of Insurance
220
Governmental Institutions
223
Government Records The Census Bureau and the Social Security Administration
225
Security Investigations
275
Federal Personnel Clearance Programs
276
The Investigative Procedure
282
Denial of Clearance
289
Privacy of Information in Dossiers
306
Appendix A
309
Welfare Institutions
317
RecordKeeping and the Intake Process in a Public Welfare Agency
319
The Setting and Its Tasks
321
Reception
325
The Intake Investigation
331
Documents as Objective and Factual Accounts
334
Concluding Remarks
353
Records in the Juvenile Court
355
Police and Juvenile Delinquency Records
360
Making and Using Juvenile Court Records
366
Consequences of Juvenile Court Records
375
Dossiers and the Law Explosion
384
Case Records in the Mental Hospital
389
RecordProcessing
392
The Patient
401
Issues of Confidentiality
407
The Law
413
Legal Control of the Dossier
415
The Direct Inquiry Question to A by B
417
Getting Information from B about A
420
Getting Information about about A from the Government
430
Striking the Balance
437
Index
445
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2011)

Stanton Wheeler (1930-2007) was Ford Foundation Professor Emeritus of Law and the Social Sciences and professorial lecturer in law at Yale Law School. He was widely recognized for his leadership in integrating law and social science and was best known for his work in the fields of white-collar crimes and prison systems. He authored ten books including Social Science in the Making, Sitting in Judgment, and Crimes of the Middle Classes.

Bibliographic information