On Royalty

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Penguin UK, Sep 6, 2007 - History - 384 pages
3 Reviews

What is the point of Kings and Queens? What do they do all day? And what does it mean to be one of them?

Jeremy Paxman is used to making politicians explain themselves – but royalty has always been off limits. Until now. In On Royalty he delves deep into the past and takes a long hard look at our present incumbents to find out just what makes them tick. Along the way he discovers some fascinating and little-known details. Such as:

• how Albania came to advertise in England for a king

• which English queen gave birth in front of 67 people

• how easy it is to beat up future kings of England

• and how meeting the Queen is a bit scary – whoever you are ...

No other book will tell you quite as much about our kings, queens, princes and princesses: who they are and what they’re for.

 

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User Review  - freelancer_frank - LibraryThing

This is a book about the psychology of monarchy, examined from the perspective of both the monarch and their subjects. Its general theses is that the monarchy, like religion, is an irrational ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stephaniechase - LibraryThing

Christopher Hitchens gave it a good review in the New York Times, but I just couldn't get into it. Paxman's writing is just too pedantic for me, and did not make this subject -- the always fascinating ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
First Find a Throne
Next Produce an Heir
Learning to be Regal
Now Find a Consort
Marshals and Mannequins
Being Gods Anointed
Killinga King 8 Divine Right and Diviner Impotence
The Happiness Business
Gilded but Gelded
The End of the Line?
Acknowledgements
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Jeremy Paxman is a journalist, best known for his work presenting Newsnight and University Challenge. His books include Friends in High Places, The English and The Political Animal. He lives in Oxfordshire.

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