On Humor

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Duke University Press, 1992 - Humor - 276 pages
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From 1929 to the latest issue, American Literature has been the foremost journal expressing the findings of those who study our national literature. American Literature has published the best work of literary historians, critics, and bibliographers, ranging from the founders of discipline to the best current critics and researchers. The longevity of this excellence lends a special distinction to the articles in American Literature.

Presented in order of their first appearance, the articles in each volume constitute a revealing record of developing insights and important shifts of critical emphasis. Each article has opened a fresh line of inquiry, established a fresh perspective on a familiar topic, or settled a question that engaged the interest of experts.

 

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Page 122 - COL. HAWKER'S INSTRUCTIONS to YOUNG SPORTSMEN in all that relates to Guns and Shooting.
Page 62 - Placerville and was very anxious to go through quick. Hank Monk cracked his whip and started off at an awful pace. The coach bounced up and down in such a terrific way that it jolted the buttons all off of Horace's coat, and finally shot his head clean through the roof of the stage, and then he yelled at Hank Monk and begged him to go easier— said he warn't in as much of a hurry as he was a while ago. But Hank Monk said, 'Keep your seat, Horace, and I'll get you there on time'— and you bet you...
Page 70 - ... the aim of the author was to supply a chasm in history which has always been overlooked — the manners, customs, amusements, wit, dialect, as they appear in all grades of society to an ear and eye witness of them.
Page 54 - When I became more calm and collected, I applied myself, by way of occupation, to the finishing of my work. I brought it to a close, as well as I could, and published it ; but the time and circumstances in which it was produced, rendered me always unable to look upon it with satisfaction.
Page 193 - ... new imagery ceases to be created, and old word,s are perverted to stand for things which are not ; a paper currency is employed, when there is no bullion in the vaults.
Page 64 - yes," he added, after looking down through the hole which the fearful jolting had made in the coachroof—" yes, I can see him ! He is there !" " Mr. Greeley," said the Chairman of the Committee, presenting himself at the window of the coach, "Mr.
Page 204 - As I expected, the crop was overgrown and useless; the sile is too rich, and planting in Arkansaw is dangerous. I had a good-sized sow killed in that same bottom land. The old thief stole an ear of corn, and took it down where she slept at night to eat. Well, she left a grain or two on the ground, and lay down on them; before morning the corn shot up, and the percussion killed her dead. I don't plant any more; natur intended Arkansaw for a hunting ground, and I go according to natur.
Page 184 - I hunted, more or less, for two or three years; and if that ain'ta particular bar hunt, I ain't got one to tell. But in the first place, stranger, let me say, I am pleased with you, because you ain't ashamed to gain information by asking, and listening, and that's what I say to Countess's pups every day when I'm home; and I have got great hopes of them ar pups, because they are continually nosing about; and though they stick it sometimes in the wrong place, they gain experience any how, and may learn...
Page 60 - But the road, even on this side, is, for most of the way, eaten into the side of a steep mountain, with a precipice of from five to fifteen hundred feet on one side and as steep an eminence on the other. Yet along this mere shelf, with hardly a place to each mile where two meeting wagons can pass, the mail-stage was driven at the rate of ten miles an hour (in one instance eleven), or just as fast as four wild California horses, whom two men could scarcely harness, could draw it.
Page 64 - Greeley was very indignant for awhile ; then he laughed, and finally presented Mr. Monk with a brannew suit of clothes. Mr. Monk himself is still in the employ of the California Stage Company, and is rather fond of relating a story that has made him famous all over the Pacific coast.

About the author (1992)

Louis J. Budd is James B. Duke Professor of English, Emeritus at Duke University.

Edwin H. Cady is Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities, Emeritus, at Duke University.

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