On the English translations of the "Imitatio Christi"

Front Cover
privately Printed, 1900 - Law - 114 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 49 - I may overcome my most evil nature, which draweth me to sin and to perdition. For I feel in my flesh the law of sin contradicting the law of my mind '', and leading me captive to the obeying of sensuality in many things ; neither can I resist the passions thereof, unless Thy most holy Grace fervently infused into my heart do assist me.
Page 95 - take it as proved that this book was in existence in the thirteenth century. We have also the evidence above referred to that it was the work of John Gersen. Who was he ? The edition of De Sessa, printed at Venice in 1501, has its heading like that of Koln, quoted above.
Page 63 - THE desire of knowledge is natural to every man, but what advantage is it to be knowing, if that knowledge be not seasoned with virtue and religion ? The vilest peasant, and he whom we in scorn think least removed from a brute, if he serve God according to the best of his mean capacity, is yet a better and more valuable man than...
Page 23 - Me, walketh not in darkness,"* saith the Lord. These are the words of Christ, by which we are admonished, how we ought to imitate his life and manners, if we will be truly enlightened, and be delivered from all blindness of heart. Let therefore our chiefest endeavor be, to meditate upon the life of Jesus Christ.
Page 39 - The Christian's Pattern ; or, a Treatise of the Imitation of Christ. Written originally in Latin, by Thomas a Kempis. With a Preface, containing an Account of the Usefulness of this Treatise ; Directions for reading it with Advantage ; and likewise an Account of this Edition. Compared with the Original, and corrected throughout, by John Wesley, MA, Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxon.
Page 47 - I may conquer my wicked nature, which draweth me to sin and to perdition. For I feel in my flesh the law of sin, contradicting the law of my mind...
Page 48 - Thou hast shewed to be so great and so necessary to salvation ; that I may overcome my most evil nature, which draweth me to sin and to perdition. For I feel in my flesh the law of sin contradicting the law of my mind...
Page 17 - Scriptures illustrated by Thomas Rogers. Imprinted at London by Henry Denham, dwelling in Paternoster Row, at the signe of the Starre, being the assigne of William Seres 1580.
Page 64 - Haec sunt verba tua, Christe, Veritas aeterna, quamvis non uno tempore prolata, nec uno in loco conscripta. Quia ergo tua sunt et vera, gratanter mihi et fideliter cuncta sunt accipienda. Tua sunt, et tu ea protulisti; et mea quoque sunt, quia pro salute mea ea edidisti.

Bibliographic information