On the Fabric of the Human Body: A Translation of De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem. The organs of nutrition and generation. Book V

Cover
Norman Publishing, 2007 - 257 Seiten
 

Inhalt

The Organs of Nutrition
49
The Peritoneum
53
The Gullet and Stomach
59
The Omentum
77
The Intestines
86
The Mesentery
102
The Liver
106
The Bladder for Yellow Bile
115
Natures Provision for the Propagation of the Species
143
The Male Organs of Generation
145
Structure of the Male Member or Penis
163
The Uterus and the Other Female Organs of Generation
168
The Cups of the Uterus
192
The Wrappings that Protect the Fetus in the Uterus
195
The Breasts
202
Indexes to Text
243

The Spleen
121
The Kidneys
129
The Bladder that Receives Urine and the Channels that Convey Urine from The Kidneys to the Bladder
137

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Autoren-Profil (2007)

Born in Brussels, Belgium, Andreas Vesalius was a Flemish anatomist whose sixteenth-century work, De humani corporis fabrica, is widely considered one of the most influential medical books. Educated at the University of Louvain, Vesalius chose the University of Paris for his medical training, where he became interested in anatomy and acquired his skills at dissection, both in the tradition of Galen. He left Paris and completed his education in 1537 at the University of Padua, then the most famous college in Europe. In Padua, Vesalius published a dissection manual for his students and continued to refine his dissection techniques and to expand his knowledge of human anatomy, mainly by dissecting cadavers. He also began to note discrepancies between his observations and what was then published about human anatomy, based on Galen's work in the second century. In 1540 Vesalius began developing the Fabrica, as it is called, which took nearly three years. He supervised all aspects of the making of the book and its publication in 1543, giving the world the finest elucidation of anatomy to that date. It proved that much of Galenic anatomy was based on inaccurate assumptions, thus altering the study of medicine profoundly. The exquisite illustrations, drawn by artists in Titian's Venetian studio, are so outstanding that they are important as art and as science. Several supplements to the original and a second edition of this great anatomical treatise were published in Vesalius's lifetime. Surprisingly, he gave up his anatomical studies and became a court physician to Emperor Charles V and later to Philip II of Spain, at whose court he remained until his death.

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