On the Classical Tongues and the Advantages of Their Study: An Inaugural Discourse, Pronounced Before the Governor and Legislature of South Carolina, by Request of the Trustees of the South Carolina College, December 12, 1835, in the Senate Chamber

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A. S. Johnston, 1836 - Classical education - 23 pages
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Page 78 - Why do those cliffs of shadowy tint appear More sweet than all the landscape smiling near ?Tis distance lends enchantment to the view, And robes the mountain in its azure hue.
Page 25 - ... palladium of your political safety and prosperity, watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety ; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned ; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.
Page 14 - ... if any man think philosophy and universality to be idle studies, he doth not consider that all professions are from thence served and supplied. And this I take to be a great cause that hath hindered the progression of learning, because these fundamental knowledges have been studied but in passage.
Page 19 - ... abhor that which is evil, and cleave to that which is good...
Page 29 - The more they are instructed, the less liable they are to the delusions of enthusiasm and superstition, which, among ignorant nations, frequently occasion the most dreadful disorders.
Page 29 - They are more disposed to examine, and more capable of seeing through the interested complaints of faction and sedition, and they are, upon that account, less apt to be misled into any wanton or unnecessary opposition to the measures of government.
Page 29 - Even though the martial spirit of the people were of no use towards the defence of the society, yet to prevent that sort of mental mutilation, deformity, and wretchedness, which cowardice necessarily involves in it, from spreading themselves through the great body of the people, would still deserve the most serious attention of government...
Page 28 - But a coward, a man incapable either of defending or of revenging himself, evidently wants one of the most essential parts of the character of a man. He is as much mutilated and deformed in his mind as another is in his body, who is either deprived of some of its most essential members, or has lost the use of them.
Page 25 - What Constitutes a State? WHAT constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate — Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned — Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride — Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No; men, high-minded men...
Page 29 - In free countries, where the safety of government depends very much upon the favourable judgment which the people may form of its conduct, it must surely be of the highest importance that they should not be disposed to judge rashly or capriciously concerning it.

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